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    Description

    Normandy Bombardment Ship - Utah Beach - USS Shubrick (DD-639). USS Shubrick (DD-639), commissioned in 1943, was a Gleaves-class destroyer, the fourth and last ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of Rear Admiral William B. Shubrick (1790-1874), a veteran of the War of 1812 and the Mexican-American War. A native of the South, he remained loyal to the Union but retired during the American Civil War. He was a lifelong friend of the author James Fenimore Cooper, who mentions him favorably in his 1856 History of the Navy of the United States of America.

    The ensign of the Shubrick is a wool bunting, 57" X 84", 48-star, double appliqué, sewn stripe flag finished with a header and grommets. It is marked on the obverse hoist, "USS SHUBRICK" and "OMAHA-UTAH NORMANDY"

    Shubrick began her service in 1943 convoying to Operation Husky, the liberation of Sicily where she provided shore bombardment. She was damaged at Palermo by a bomb that left her damaged and without power; killing and wounding 29 crewmen. She returned to the States for a refit.

    She was back in service again escorting convoys before joining Operation Neptune, the naval component of Operation Overlord, the invasion of Europe. Shubrick was assigned top Force "U", Bombardment Group (125.8). On June 6th, she escorted the USS Nevada and her cruisers to Utah Beach and then took her preassigned station to shell her designated targets. Shubrick bombarded the coast, scoring a direct hit on a German battery before ceasing fire to avoid hitting friendly forces. She remained off the Normandy for over a month, performing escort duties, fire support missions, anti-motor torpedo boat and anti-submarine patrols, with trips to England for replenishment, before sailing to the Mediterranean for the invasion of southern France.

    Transferred to the Pacific in 1945, she performed escort duties for the USS Mississippi. In May, she was on picket duty when she was attacked by two kamikazes. The damage was severe with many casualties and her wartime career was over. She returned to the States and was decommissioned.

    This is an ensign for a D-Day, Utah Beach, destroyer, or Naval War collector.

    For her WWII service the USS Shubrick was awarded: American Campaign Medal, Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal with three campaign stars, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with campaign star, and the World War II Victory Medal.

    Condition: The ensign of the Shubrick is in good condition, It is used, worn, and soiled, but otherwise complete.

    This flag was formerly in the collection of Dr. Clarence Rungee, and is accompanied by his original museum inventory sheet with identifying information.


    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    June, 2020
    6th Saturday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 4
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 292

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