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    Description

    Secretary of the Confederate Navy S. R. Mallory writes to Commander John Taylor Wood of the CSS Tallahassee on official Confederate States of America Navy Department stationery. Wood is authorized to depart on what would become perhaps the greatest 19-day naval raid up the Atlantic coast, as far north as Halifax, destroying 26 vessels and capturing 7 others!
    This letter is dated July 26th, 1864 and is in the hand of S. R. Mallory, Sec. of the C. S. Navy. Mallory states:

    "Sir

    For pay and expenses of your vessel you are authorized to draw at ten days sight upon Commander James D. Bulloch CSN, Liverpool, Care of Frazer Trenholm Co. Liverpool for such funds as you may require to the extent of L10,000 Ten thousand pounds sterling.

    Very Respectfully

    Yr. Obt. Sevt.

    S. R. Mallory

    Sec. Navy"

    James D. Bulloch, CSN, mentioned in the letter, was the Confederacy's Chief Foreign Agent in Great Britain during the Civil War. Based in Liverpool he operated blockade runners and provided the Confederacy with its only source of hard currency. Bulloch would arrange "unofficial" purchases by Britain of Confederate cotton. The blockade runners would in turn send weapons and supplies to the Confederacy. His secret service funds were alleged to have been used in the planning of Lincoln's assassination.

    Cross written in red ink neatly on the left side of this document is written:

    "Drawn Halifax August 1864 at ten days sight two drafts on Commander James D. Bulloch favor B. Wier & Co. for one thousand pounds sterling (Each 500 pounds and one in hundred pounds sterling.)"

    Significance: Notice that the docket cross-written is from Halifax...the Tallahassee never made it to Liverpool, again, part of the amazing story of her voyage, which you can read from the portion of the book "SEA GHOST OF THE CONFEDERACY" that will be provided. You can also read about the exploits of the CSS Tallahassee on various internet articles. John Taylor Wood was one of the Civil War's leading Confederate Naval heroes. He was the grandson of Zachary Taylor and the nephew of Jefferson Davis. He was a Lieut. serving on the CSS Virginia when it engaged the USS Monitor in 1862, one of the most famous Naval battles in history. In 1865 he was caught with Confederate President Jefferson Davis, his uncle, after fleeing Richmond. He escaped and made his way to Cuba and eventually Halifax, Nova Scotia...the same city the CSS Tallahassee ended up in!

    Docketed on the reverse of this letter :

    "Letter from Hon. Mr. Mallory
    To J. Taylor Wood
    Letter of credit for
    L 10,000"

    The letter is in fine condition. From the Calvin Packard Civil War Battlefield Letter Collection.


    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    December, 2020
    6th Sunday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 1
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
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