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    Description

    Future Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith 1847 Presentation Sword for Heroism During the Mexican War. Edmund Kirby Smith would serve honorably and well with the Confederate States Army, making a significant contribution at First Manassas and receiving promotions from colonel at the beginning of the war to the rank of full general by the close of the war. But Smith had honors bestowed upon him by earlier armies who fought under him. This ornate presentation sword is proof of his early military acumen.

    A Florida native and 1845 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, he quickly came under fire in the Mexican War at the Battle of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, and Churubusco. He was promoted to captain on August 20, 1847, which prompted his men to present him with this ornate sword. With a 31" blade, this staff officer's sword measures 37" overall. While having a highly-etched blade, this type of sword was actually very serviceable and saw much use as it is double-edged and well-balanced with a 1" wide blade. The blade has cross-hatching at the ricasso with an elaborate floral design extending 16" up the blade through a central fuller. There is no maker's mark. The sword has an elaborate foliate shaped heavy guard, or elongated quillon which is capped by a brass ferrule below a carved bone grip that is cracked at three places. It has a knuckle-guard chain intact that extends from the quillon to the pommel which is in the form of an open eagle's beak.

    The pommel has come loose from the grip but can be easily secured under the ferrule. The scabbard is made of gilded brass with floral engraving at the two mounts and at the midpoint of the scabbard. There is a frog stud attached to the upper mount. The elaborate presentation engraving occurs between the mounts as follows: "To Capt. Edmund K. Smith By Your Fellow Officers & Men 7th Inf Sept. 1847". An elaborate engraved period federal eagle holding a shield and a quiver of arrows separates the remainder of the dedication as follows: "-For- Bravery, Courage Leadership Cerro Gordo Contreras Churubusco". This is a beautiful and historic sword presented to one the greatest military officers in American history. It is emblematic of the early careers and early wartime accomplishments that so many of the Civil War generals experienced before the conflict between the North and South.


    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    June, 2007
    24th-25th Sunday-Monday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 1
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 948

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