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    First Collected Edition of the Voyages of Sir Francis Drake

    [Sir Francis Drake, subject]. Sir Francis Drake Revived. Who is or may be a Pattern to stirre up all Heroicke and active Spirits of these Times... Being a Summary and true Relation of foure severall Voyages... to the West Indies. London: Nicholas Bourne, [1652]-1653. First collected edition. Four parts in one quarto volume. A-M4, A-O4, A-G4, H2. (3), 87, (1), 108, 60 pages. Modern green morocco over green cloth boards, title in gilt to spine. Lacks front blanks to first and second parts. Portrait trimmed and laid down, rust hole to first A3 & K4 with loss of a few characters, small hole to H2 of second book, no text affect. Margins shaved with some loss to headlines, some marginalia. A few minor stains and some light browning. A very good copy. From the Krown & Spellman Collection.
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    More Information:

    The first collected edition of Drake's voyages, the four parts comprising:

    1. Sir Francis Drake Revived: the voyages of 1570-71 and 1572-73 describes Drake's privateering expeditions to the West Indies, the raid on Nombre de Dios in 1572, when he captured a fortune of Spanish silver from the center of the Spanish New World empire.

    2. The World Encompassed: the voyage of 1577-80. Compiled by Francis Drake, nephew of the late explorer, it narrates Drake's memorable voyage, in which his five vessels raided Spanish outposts and supply routes on the Pacific coast, claimed California ("New Albion") for the British crown and returned via the Pacific and Indian Oceans, making Drake the first English captain to circumnavigate the globe.

    3. A Summarie and True Discourse of [his] West Indian Voyage: the voyage of 1585-86 that was begun by Bigges, an officer under Drake, and finished after his death, probably by his lieutenant, Master Croftes. Drake's expedition to the Spanish Indies was the first major British naval foray into the Caribbean and was sanctioned by a commission from Queen Elizabeth with letters of marque. As well as capturing and sacking a number of cities he also rescued the 103 colonists remaining on Raleigh's Roanoke Island Virginia colony and returned them to England along with a shipment of potatoes and tobacco.

    4. A Full Relation of Another Voyage to the West Indies: a narrative of his last voyage of 1595-1596, to the West Indies, during which Drake died.

    "Drake was, essentially, the greatest of all the Elizabethan sailors: a man ready for any adventure, beloved and followed by his men, yet absolute master on his own deck. A man, moreover, of the highest practical intelligence in all walks of life and, of this, no better example can be given than the 'leat' which still bears his name and still carries the pure water of Dartmoor to the town of Plymouth." (Brittania).

    Wing D-2122. Sabin 20840, 20855, 20843, 20830. Church 526. Hill, pp. 86, 211.

    Drake, Francis. Sir Francis Drake Revived. Who is or may be a Pattern to stirre up all Heroicke and active Spirits of these Times... Being a Summary and true Relation of foure severall Voyages... to the West Indies. London: Nicholas Bourne, (1652)-1653. 4to. Four parts in one volume. A-M4, A-O4, A-G4, H2. (3), 87, (1), 108, 60p. Modern green morocco over green cloth boards, title in gilt to spine. Lacks front blanks to first and second parts. Portrait trimmed and laid down, rust hole to first A3 & K4 with loss of a few characters, small hole to H2 of second book, no text affect. Margins shaved with some loss to headlines, some marginalia. few minor stains and some light browning. First collected edition. FIRST COLLECTED EDITION of Drake's voyages, the four parts comprising:
    1. Sir Francis Drake Revived, the voyages of 1570-71 and 1572-73 describes Drake's privateering expeditions to the West Indies, the raid on Nombre de Dios in 1572, when he captured a fortune of Spanish silver from the center of the Spanish New World empire.
    2. The World Encompassed, the voyage of 1577-80. Compiled by Francis Drake, nephew of the late explorer, it narrates Drake's memorable voyage, in which his five vessels raided Spanish outposts and supply routes on the Pacific coast, claimed California ("New Albion") for the British crown and returned via the Pacific and Indian Oceans, making Drake the first English captain to circumnavigate the globe.
    3. A Summarie and True Discourse of [his] West Indian Voyage, the voyage of 1585-86 that was begun by Bigges, an officer under Drake, and finished after his death, probably by his lieutenant, Master Croftes. Drake's expedition to the Spanish Indies was the first major British naval foray into the Caribbean and was sanctioned by a commission from Queen Elizabeth with letters of marque. As well as capturing and sacking a number of cities he also rescued the 103 colonists remaining on Raleigh's Roanoke Island Virginia colony and returned them to England along with a shipment of potatoes and tobacco.
    4. A Full Relation of Another Voyage to the West Indies, a narrative of his last voyage of 1595-1596, to the West Indies, during which Drake died.

    ÒFrancis Drake was probably born in Devon around 1540 and, though they denied it, was almost certainly distant kin to the gentle family of Drakes of that county. Hardly anything certain is known of him until he appears as engaged in the trade to the Guinea coast in 1565. Two years later, he leaped into fame as commander of a ship in the squadron of his kinsman, Hawkins, trading, in defiance of prohibitions, to Spanish America. Hawkins and Drake were treacherously set upon in the harbour of St. Juan de Lua and all their vessels, but two, were destroyed. On their return, they moved the English government to demand redress but, failing in this, decided to recoup themselves by 'piratical' expeditions against Spanish commerce.
    In 1570, 1571 & 72, Drake made three successive voyages to the West Indies and, on the third of these, took and sacked the town of Nombre de Dios, then the Atlantic depot of the gold and silver from the mines of the Pacific coast. Much of the plunder of the town had to be abandoned owing to a severe wound received by Drake in the attack, but much was gained and brought home; and it was upon this voyage that Drake, for the first time, saw, from the top of a great tree, the Pacific Ocean and vowed to sail an English ship on it.
    In 1577, therefore, he undertook, in his famous ship the Pelican or Golden Hind of 100 tons, and with four smaller vessels, the passage to the 'South Seas' by the Straits of Magellan. In the course of this voyage, in which he was deserted by one ship, lost another in a storm and had to break up the other two as unseaworthy, Drake successfully accomplished the dangerous passage, was driven south as far as latitude 57 degrees, sailed up the Pacific coast of South America, plundered Valparaiso, took the Cacafuego (the richest prize in history) and cruised north as far as San Francisco. Then, thinking it safer not to return by the Straits, struck, without chart or pilot, across the Pacific to the Ladrones Islands. Off Celebes the Golden Hind stuck on a rock for twenty hours, floated off unhurt, touched at Java and again at Sierra Leone and finally reached England, laden with spices as well as with Spanish treasure, in September 1580.
    The Spanish ambassador, naturally enough, demanded that the crew should be hanged as pirates; but Queen Elizabeth I was able to prove that the Spaniards were perpetually stirring up insurrections in Ireland and England against her government and treating English ships in much the same way as Drake had treated Spanish. Further, she asserted the right of Englishmen to sail any seas, in defiance of the Spanish claim to regard the Pacific as a mare clausum; and she emphasized her protest by knighting Drake.
    In 1582, the successful adventurer became Mayor of Plymouth and also, unofficially, the government's chief adviser on naval affairs. He sat in Parliament, in 1585, and in the autumn of that year was sent in command of twenty-five sail to exact, in Spanish America, reprisals for the embargo which Philip had just laid on all English ships. On that voyage, Drake plundered Vigo in Spain, then crossed the Atlantic and took and held to ransom San Domingo, Carthagena and several towns in Florida, relieved and brought home the first colonists of Virginia and returned to England in the Summer of 1586.
    In the following spring, he was sent to repeat his exploits in the harbours of Spain herself, where ships were now being openly prepared for the invasion of England. He pushed right into Cadiz and sank, burned or carried away thirty-eight ships. If the Queen had allowed him to go on and do the same thing in Lisbon the Armada would never have been able to sail when it did. In the defeat of that fleet, when it came at last, Drake's share was the primary one and he was constantly urging the government to greater and greater exertions by sea.
    In the 'Counter Armada' of 1589, he was less successful but managed to burn the shipping and part of the town of Coruna. Troops were landed for an attack on Lisbon, which failed, and Drake was accused of staying outside the harbour, picking up prizes. For the next five years, there is little trace of his activity and his last expedition (1595) with Sir John Hawkins to the West Indies was utterly unsuccessful. The Spaniards were forewarned and every port in America was fortified. Hawkins died off Porto Rico and Drake off Porto Bello. He was buried at sea.
    Drake was, essentially, the greatest of all the Elizabethan sailors: a man ready for any adventure, beloved and followed by his men, yet absolute master on his own deck. A man, moreover, of the highest practical intelligence in all walks of life and, of this, no better example can be given than the 'leat' which still bears his name and still carries the pure water of Dartmoor to the town of Plymouth.Ó - Brittania.

    Wing D-2122. Sabin 20840, 20855, 20843, 20830. Church 526. Hill, p.86 & 211. Travel. Pirates. Piracy. History. West Indies. Voyages. Roanoke Island. America. Tobacco.



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    Auction Dates
    October, 2014
    8th Wednesday
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