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    Description

    [Northeast -- Map of the New Netherlands and New England]. Willem Janz. Blaeu. Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova. [Amsterdam: 1635]. Hand-colored double-page engraved map of the New Netherlands and New England, oriented with west to the top. Plate size: 15.25 x 20 inches; 388 x 508 mm. Sheet size: 20.5 x 25 inches; 520 x 635 mm. Text on verso in Latin. Edges browned; centerfold strengthened on verso; faint horizontal crease. A fine example, with original hand-coloring. Matted (matte size: 22 x 26.125 inches; 558 x 664 mm.).

    "This important map was one of the most attractive of the Americas at the time. It is noted for the fact that its primary source is the first manuscript figurative map of Adriaen Block, 1614...It is one of the earliest to name Nieu Amsterdam. Block, a Dutch fur trader, explored the area between Cape Cod and Manhattan, examining the bays and rivers along the way. This helped to create an accurate picture of the longitudinal scale of the coastline...The whole map is adorned by deer, foxes, bears, egrets, rabbits, cranes and turkeys. Beavers, polecats and otters appear on a printed map for the first time. The Mohawk Indian village top right is derived from the de Bry-White engravings. The map survived through the remaining publishing history of the Blaeu house. Willem Blaeu himself died in 1638, and the business passed to his sons, Cornelis and Joan. The latter, particularly, carried the family name and was the driving force behind the multi volume Atlas Major" (Burden).

    "One of the earliest large-scale maps to include the part of North America settled by Dutch. First printed map that depicted canoes and North American fauna. Lake Champlain (Lacus Irocoisiensis) shown incorrectly, as in other maps of the period...Printed separately as a double-page spread-originally intended for Blaeu's Novus Atlas but not included in that work until 1640. Was also included in Blaeu's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum sive Atlas Novus (Amsterdam, 1635)" (Schwartz/ Ehrenberg).

    "This beautiful map of New England and the New Netherlands is one of the earliest maps to include that part of North America colonized by the Dutch, and is the first printed map showing Indian canoes and several kinds of North American fauna, such as turkeys, beavers, polecats and otters" (Goss).

    Burden 241; Goss, Map 28; Schwartz/Ehrenberg, Plate 58 (p. 103).


    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    September, 2019
    5th Thursday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 7
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 493

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