Description

    Two Important First Edtions by Johannes Stoeffler

    Johannes Stoeffler. Calendarium Romanum Magnum, Caesareae maiestati dicatum. [Bound with:] Elucidatio Fabricae Usuaque; Astrolabii. Oppenheim: Jacob Koebel, [1518,] 1513. First editions. Two folio works in one volume. Approximately 10.75 x 7.75 inches. "Calendarium": *6, **8, 74, A6, B8, C4, D6, E*, (2a, 2b4, 2c6, 2d4, 2e2), "Elucidatio": XII, A-D6, E8, F-K6,L4, M-N6. (14), 74 pages, (50), XII, LXXVIII. "Calendarium," title page woodcut border depicting over thirty coats of arms, page 14 with full-page woodcut of Anatomical Man, calendrical tables; six leaf section printed in two columns, in red and black, with geographical coordinates for dozens of European cities, and a small woodcut city view at the bottom of each column; the calendar follows, printed on thirteen leaves, in red and black, one page for each month, with the zodiacal sign in a woodcut rondelle at the fore edge, and a woodcut illustrating the common activities for the month printed at the foot of each page, calendars for 1518, 1537 and 1556 on the verso of each; the next eleven pages are taken up with illustrated tables of partial and total solar and lunar eclipses, printed in red and black, for the years from 1518 to 1573; forty- seven pages of tables printed in red and black of moveable feasts, solar and lunar cycles, and the positions of the signs of the zodiac up to 1579; followed by four full-paged black and red woodcuts of astronomical instruments. "Elucidatio Fabricae," title page printed within architectural woodcut compartment; woodcut arms of George Simler; nineteen large woodcut diagrams, with extension slips on several, fifteen woodcuts depicting perspective and measurement techniques; six smaller text woodcuts and five astrological charts.
    Contemporary vellum over boards, ink title to head of spine. Inner hinge starting and bibliographic notes to inside of front board in pencil. Few leaves with browning, few occasional stains, few leaves with minor repairs to outer margins. Minor pin hole sized worming to outer margins, first few leaves and last few leaves with no affect to text. B2 has a small repair to bottom of leaf, no affect. Small tear at top of "Elucidatio" title page, M4 with square repair at top right corner, some loss of text and some loss to illustration on recto. Minor edge tear to bottom of first title and top of last leaf, no affect. A very good copy.
    Stoeffler's "Calendarium Romanum Magnum," proposing for reform of the Julian calendar. From the first press of Oppenheim, which operated from 1503-1532. Luxuriously illustrated encyclopedia of sciences, and an important forerunner to the Gregorian calendar introduced in 1582. Considered by Benzing as "perhaps the most important work of Kobel's press." Text consists of forty-one propositions demonstrating the effects of the stars on all aspects of human life. In addition to extensive astronomical information, this work contains sections on blood-letting, human circulatory system, and ancient and modern observances of Easter.
    Bound with "Elucidatio Fabricae Ususque Astrolabii," on the astrolabe. One of the most influential books on a scientific instrument ever published and the most comprehensive treatise on the astrolabe of its time. Stoeffler ends this work with a discussion of perspective and measurement. Many authors of the many books on mathematical instruments to be published in the sixteenth century followed Stoeffler's example.
    Johann Stoeffler (1452-1531) was professor of mathematics and astronomy at Tübingen, and was the teacher of Phillip Melanchthon and Sebastian Münster. "Invited by Pope Leo X in June 1515 to take part in a project to reform the calendar, Stoeffler published Calendarium romanum magnum, printed by Jacob Koebel in 1518 in Oppenheim. This was later issued in German as Der newe gross Roemische Calendar (Oppenheim, Jacob Koebel, 1531). As a necessary preparation for this calendar reform, he published a number of ephemerides. Stoeffler maintained, as did Paul of Middenburg, that the spring equinox should not be a fixed date. Instead, using the meridian of Tübingen and the Alphonsine Tables, and following the practice of the Church fathers, he suggested a variable equinoctial date for which up-to-date ephemerides were indispensable" - Biographical Encyclopaedia of Astronomers (p. 1089-1090)
    "[Elucidatio]was first published in 1512/13 by his printer, Jacob Koebel and was an immediate success with astronomers, mathematicians, astrologers (speculators of the sky), surveyors, and other students of the good arts, and has been cited by virtually every author on the subject ever since. By 1619, Elucidatio had gone through sixteen editions, mostly in Latin, but also in French and German." - Classical Science Press.
    "... an independent literature of printed treatises on mathematical instruments was launched in 1513 by Johann Stoeffler with his Elucidatio fabricae ususque astrolabii. The formula of 'construction and use' was adopted for many of the accounts of particular mathematical instruments that were published through the century. Stoeffler first tells his readers how to make an astrolabe, then, in a series of worked examples, how to use it. The treatise presents itself not in the context of an overarching discipline but as an independent manual for a particular instrument." - Isis, Vol.102, No.4 on early mathematical instruments.
    "Calendarium": Adams S1884. Fairfax Murray 403. VD16 S9188. Caillet 10385. Houzeau-Lancater 13730. Stillwell 112. Wellcome I: 6102. Ferguson II: 676. Benzing, Kobel 58. BMC German 833. Panzer 7: S491.
    "Elucidatio ": Adams S1886. Houzeau & Lancaster 3256. Cantamessa II: 4333. Wellcome I: 6099. From the Krown & Spellman Collection.
    Please visit HA.com/6117 for an extended description of this lot.


    More Information:

    Stoeffler, Johannes. Calendarium Romanum Magnum, Caesareae maiestati dicatum. (bound with) Elucidatio Fabricae Usuaque; Astrolabii. Oppenheim: Jacob Koebel, (1518), 1513. Folio. Two books in one volume. "Calendarium": *6, **8, 74, A6, B8, C4, D6, E*, (2a, 2b4, 2c6, 2d4, 2e2), "Elucidatio": XII, A-D6, E8, F-K6,L4, M-N6. (14), 74p., (50), XII, LXXVIII. Contemporary vellum over boards, ink title to head of spine. Inner hinge starting and bibliographic notes to inside of front board in pencil. Few leaves with browning, few occasional stains, few leafs with minor repairs to outer margins. Minor pin hole sized worming to outer margins, first few leaves and last few leaves with no affect to text. B2, small repair to bottom of leaf, no affect. Small tear at top of "Elucidatio" title page, M4 with square repair at top right corner, some loss of text and some loss to illustration on recto. Minor edge tear to bottom of first title and top of last leaf, no affect.

    (Calendarium Romanum Magnum), title page woodcut border depicting over 30 coats of arms, p.14 with full-page woodcut of Anatomical Man, calendrical tables; six leaf section printed in two columns, in red and black, with geographical coordinates for dozens of European cities, and a small woodcut city view at the bottom of each column; the calendar follows, printed on thirteen leaves, in red and black, one page for each month, with the zodiacal sign in a woodcut rondelle at the fore edge, and a woodcut illustrating the common activities for the month printed at the foot of each page, calendars for 1518, 1537 and 1556 on the verso of each; the next eleven pages are taken up with illustrated tables of partial and total solar and lunar eclipses, printed in red and black, for the years from 1518 to 1573; forty- seven pages of tables printed in red and black of moveable feasts, solar and lunar cycles, and the positions of the signs of the zodiac up to 1579; followed by four full-paged black and red woodcuts of astronomical instruments.

    (Elucidatio Fabricae), title page printed within architectural woodcut compartment; woodcut arms of George Simler; nineteen large woodcut diagrams, with extension slips on several, fifteen woodcuts depicting perspective and measurement techniques; six smaller text woodcuts and five astrological charts. First editions.

    First edition of Stoeffler's "Calendarium Romanum Magnum," proposing for reform of the Julian calendar. From the first press of Oppenheim, which operated from 1503-1532. Luxuriously illustrated encyclopedia of sciences, and an important forerunner to the Gregorian calendar introduced in 1582. Considered by Benzing as "perhaps the most important work of Kobel's press." Text consists of 41 propositions demonstrating the effects of the stars on all aspects of human life. In addition to extensive astronomical information, this work contains sections on blood-letting, human circulatory system, and ancient and modern observances of Easter.

    Bound with Stoeffler's first edition of "Elucidatio Fabricae Ususque Astrolabii," on the astrolabe. One of the most influential books on a scientific instrument ever published and the most comprehensive treatise on the astrolabe of its time. Stoeffler ends this work with a discussion of perspective and measurement. Many authors of the many books on mathematical instruments to be published in the sixteenth century followed Stoeffler's example.

    Johann Stoeffler (1452-1531) was professor of mathematics and astronomy at Tübingen, and was the teacher of Phillip Melanchthon and Sebastian Münster. "Invited by Pope Leo X in June 1515 to take part in a project to reform the calendar, Stoeffler published Calendarium romanum magnum, printed by Jacob Koebel in 1518 in Oppenheim. This was later issued in German as Der newe gross Roemische Calendar (Oppenheim, Jacob Koebel, 1531). As a necessary preparation for this calendar reform, he published a number of ephemerides. Stoeffler maintained, as did Paul of Middenburg, that the spring equinox should not be a fixed date. Instead, using the meridian of Tübingen and the Alphonsine Tables, and following the practice of the Church fathers, he suggested a variable equinoctial date for which up-to-date ephemerides were indispensable" - Biographical Encyclopaedia of Astronomers (p. 1089-1090)

    "[Elucidatio]was first published in 1512/13 by his printer, Jacob Koebel and was an immediate success with astronomers, mathematicians, astrologers (speculators of the sky), surveyors, and other students of the good arts, and has been cited by virtually every author on the subject ever since. By 1619, Elucidatio had gone through sixteen editions, mostly in Latin, but also in French and German." - Classical Science Press.

    "... an independent literature of printed treatises on mathematical instruments was launched in 1513 by Johann Stoeffler with his Elucidatio fabricae ususque astrolabii. The formula of 'construction and use' was adopted for many of the accounts of particular mathematical instruments that were published through the century. Stoeffler first tells his readers how to make an astrolabe, then, in a series of worked examples, how to use it. The treatise presents itself not in the context of an overarching discipline but as an independent manual for a particular instrument." - Isis, Vol.102, No.4 on early mathematical instruments.

    "...he acquired a great reputation, which however he lost again in a great measure, by intermeddling with the prediction of future events. He announced a great deluge, which he said would happen in the year 1524, a prediction with which he terrified all Germany, where many persons prepared vessels proper to escape from the floods. The prediction failing, served to convince him of the absurdity of his prognostications." -Chalmers.

    "Jacob Koebel, or Kobel (ca.1462-1533) from Heidelberg. He worked for different printers until he owned his printing shop in 1499 in the German city of Oppenheim. His friend Johannes Stoeffler...had written a comprehensive treatise on the astrolabe, 'Elucidatio fabricae ususque astrolabii.' Jacob Koebel printed it and added a guide to the operation of the astrolabe: Astrolabii Declaratio. The book had numerous editions and translations. Later, Nicolaus Copernicus will own a beautiful book printed by Koebel in 1518. It was Stoeffler's Calendarium Romanum Magnum,." - The Life of Copernicus, Pierre Gassendi.

    "Calendarium": Adams S1884. Fairfax Murray 403. VD16 S9188. Caillet 10385. Houzeau-Lancater 13730. Stillwell 112. Wellcome I: 6102. Ferguson II: 676. Benzing, Kobel 58. BMC German 833. Panzer 7: S491.

    "Elucidatio ": Adams S1886. Houzeau & Lancaster 3256. Cantamessa II: 4333. Wellcome I: 6099.



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