Description

    First Latin Edition of Galileo's Landmark Dialogo

    Galileo Galilei. Systema Cosmicum... In quo Quatuor Dialogis, De Duobus Maximus Mundi Systematibus, Ptolemaico et Copernicano. Strasbourg: D. Hauttius for Elzevirs, 1635. First Latin edition of The Dialogo, Galileo's exposition and advancement of the Copernican system. Notoriously placed on the Vatican's list of outlawed books. This translation contains two important appendices by Kepler and Foscarini concerning the debate over the compatibility of the theory of the earth's movement with Scripture. A PMM title. Quarto. )(4, a4, A-3T4. (16), 495, (21) pages. Includes errata leaf. Pages 473-479 misnumbered (but quires follow complete). Numerous woodcut diagrams throughout. Contemporary vellum, manuscript title to spine, housed in custom matching slipcase. Lacks frontispiece and third and fourth leaf (dedication and portrait), all supplied in fine facsimile. It is very possible the original leaves are lacking due to the fact this was a suppressed book at the time and put on the Vatican's outlaw list. Pages evenly darkened (as usual). Title page with small tears to inner margin, no affect. Bookplate of "Stillman Drake" (specialist on Galileo, see below) inside front board. "This 1635 edition of Galileo's work was published at the Elzeviers' expense and printed in Strasbourg while Galileo was under house arrest." (Elsevier Heritage Collection: The Highlights). Overall, a very good copy.
    "The Dialogo was designed both as an appeal to the great public and as an escape from silence. In the form of an open discussion between three friends -- intellectually speaking, a radical, a conservative, and an agnostic -- it is a masterly polemic for the new science. It displays all the great discoveries in the heavens which the ancients had ignored; it inveighs against the sterility, willfulness, and ignorance of those who defend their systems; it revels in the simplicity of Copernican thought and, above all, it teaches that the movement of the earth makes sense in philosophy, that is, in physics. Astronomy and the science of motion, rightly understood, says Galileo, are hand in glove. There is no need to fear that the earth's rotation will cause it to fly to pieces. So Galileo picked up one thread that led straight to Newton. The Dialogo, far more than any other work, made the heliocentric system a commonplace." (PMM).
    "Stillman Drake (December 24, 1910 - October 6, 1993) was a Canadian historian of science best known for his work on Galileo Galilei (1564 -1642). Drake published over 131 books, articles, and book chapters on Galileo... In 1984 Drake was awarded the Galileo Galilei Prize for the Italian History of Science by the Italian Rotary Clubs. The jury was composed of Italian epistemologists and science historians. In 1988 Drake was awarded the Sarton Medal by the History of Science Society. He spent his entire academic career, beginning in 1967 after working as a consultant, at the University of Toronto's Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology." (Wikipedia).
    BL German II: G35. Carli and Favaro 148. Cinti 96. Riccardi I, 512. Willems 426. Printing and the Mind of Man 128. Not in Norman. From the Krown & Spellman Collection.
    Please visit HA.com/6117 for an extended description of this lot.


    More Information:

    Galilei, Galileo. Systema Cosmicum... In quo Quatuor Dialogis, De Duobus Maximus Mundi Systematibus, Ptolemaico et Copernicano. Strassburg: D. Hauttius for Elzevirs, 1635. 4to. )(4, a4, A-3T4. (16), 495, (21) p. Contemporary vellum, manuscript title to spine, housed in custom matching slipcase. Lacks frontispiece and third and fourth leaf (dedication and portrait), all supplied in fine facsimile. It is very possible the original leaves are lacking due to the fact this was a supressed book at the time and put on the Vatican's outlaw list. Pages evenly darkened (as usual). Title page with small tears to inner margin, no affect. Book plate "Stillman Drake" (specialist on Galileo, see notes) inside front board. Includes errata leaf. p.473-479 misnumbered (but quires follow complete). Numerous woodcut diagrams throughout. Lacks frontispiece and portrait, but supplied in fine facsimile. (See description for possible reason of removal of leaves). First Latin edition. First Latin edition of The Dialogo, Galileo's exposition and advancement of the Copernican system. Notoriously placed on the Vatican's list of outlawed books. This translation contains two important appendices by Kepler and Foscarini concerning the debate over the compatibility of the theory of the earth's movement with Scripture.

    "This 1635 edition of Galileo's work was published at the Elzeviers' expense and printed in Strasbourg while Galileo was under house arrest." - Elsevier Heritage Collection: The Highlights.

    "The Dialogo was designed both as an appeal to the great public and as an escape from silence. In the form of an open discussion between three friends -- intellectually speaking, a radical, a conservative, and an agnostic -- it is a masterly polemic for the new science. It displays all the great discoveries in the heavens which the ancients had ignored; it inveighs against the sterility, willfulness, and ignorance of those who defend their systems; it revels in the simplicity of Copernican thought and, above all, it teaches that the movement of the earth makes sense in philosophy, that is, in physics. Astronomy and the science of motion, rightly understood, says Galileo, are hand in glove. There is no need to fear that the earth"s rotation will cause it to fly to pieces. So Galileo picked up one thread that led straight to Newton. The Dialogo, far more than any other work, made the heliocentric system a commonplace." [Printing and the Mind of Man 128.]

    "Pope Urban VIII was not so swayed, and immediately convened a special commission to examine the book and make recommendations. In casting the Pope as the simple-minded Aristotelian Simplicius, Galileo brought upon himself arrest, trial by the Inquisition and life imprisonment. The sentence was commuted to permanent house arrest, while the printing of any of his works was forbidden. The Dialogo remained on the index until 1832." [Richard Green Sale Cat Sotheby's 2008]

    "Stillman Drake (December 24, 1910 - October 6, 1993) was a Canadian historian of science best known for his work on Galileo Galilei (1564 -1642). Drake published over 131 books, articles, and book chapters on Galileo. Drake received his first academic appointment in 1967 as full professor at the University of Toronto after a career as a financial consultant. During that time he had begun his studies of the works of Galileo and translated Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1953), parts of four of Galileo's works in Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), and Galileo's The Assayer in The Controversy of Comets (1960), co-authored with C. D. O'Malley Possibly his most significant contribution to the history of science was his defense of Galileo's experiments as documented in his published Two New Sciences and in his manuscript notes. Drake showed how the complex interaction of experimental measurement and mathematical analysis led Galileo to his law of falling bodies. This clearly refuted Alexandre Koyré's claim that experiment played no significant part in Galileo's thought.[citation needed]

    In 1984 Drake was awarded the Galileo Galilei Prize for the Italian History of Science by the Italian Rotary Clubs. The jury was composed of Italian epistemologists and science historians. In 1988 Drake was awarded the Sarton Medal by the History of Science Society. He spent his entire academic career, beginning in 1967 after working as a consultant, at the University of Toronto's Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology" - Wikipedia.

    BL German II: G35. Carli and Favaro 148. Cinti 96. Riccardi I, 512. Willems 426. Not in Norman.



    Fees, Shipping, and Handling Description: Books & Catalogs (view shipping information)

    Sales Tax information  |  Terms and Conditions

    Bidding Guidelines and Bid Increments

    Glossary of Terms

    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    April, 2015
    8th-9th Wednesday-Thursday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 6
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 1,930

    Buyer's Premium per Lot:
    25% on the first $100,000 (minimum $14), plus 20% of any amount between $100,000 and $1,000,000, plus 12% of any amount over $1,000,000 per lot.

    Sold for: Sign-in or Join (free & quick)

    Heritage membership

    Join Now - It's Free

    VIEW BENEFITS
    1. Past Auction Values (prices, photos, full descriptions, etc.)
    2. Bid online
    3. Free Collector newsletter
    4. Want List with instant e-mail notifications
    5. Reduced auction commissions when you resell your
      winnings 
    Consign now
    • Cash Advances
    • More Bidders
    • Trusted Experts
    • Over 200,000 Satisfied Consignors Since 1976
    Consign to the 2018 June 10 Civil War, Militaria, Arms & Armor - Dallas.

    Learn about consigning with us

    Heritage has gone above and beyond my expectations in handling all of my transactions in a thoroughly professional manner. I would not hesitate to recommend them to anyone worldwide for the exemplary auction and valuation services they provide.
    Richard H.,
    Corsicana, TX
    View More Testimonials

    HA.com receives more traffic than any other auction house website. (Source: Similarweb.com)

    Video tutorial

    Getting the most out of search

    Recent auctions

    2017 November 10 Space Exploration - Dallas
    2017 November 10 Space Exploration - Dallas
    REALIZED SO FAR $852,131