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    Charles Dickens. [Christmas Books], comprising: A Christmas Carol. With Illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First edition, first issue, with text uncorrected, "Stave I" as first chapter heading, red and blue title-page dated 1843, blue half-title, and yellow endpapers. With a Third Person Autograph Note Signed by Charles Dickens to a Mr. Becker, 29 November 1856. Small octavo (6.4375 x 4.0625 inches; 163 x 104 mm.). [8], 166, [2, ads] pages. Four hand-colored steel-engraved plates and four wood-engraved text illustrations. Publisher's light reddish brown vertically-ribbed cloth. Covers decoratively stamped in blind with a single-line border enclosing a decorative border of holly and ivy; front cover decoratively lettered in gilt within a gilt wreath of holly leaves; spine lettered in gilt within an ornament of holly and mistletoe entwined with a curving banner; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. The binding matches Todd's first impression, second issue, first state, with the closest interval between the left blindstamped border and the left extremity of the gilt wreath measuring 13 mm. and with the upper serif of the "D" in "Dickens" unbroken. Just slightly skewed. Some areas of discoloration to cloth; corners lightly bumped, with fraying at tips, and bits of boards exposed; cloth at spine extremities chipped, with a little loss and fraying at foot; front joint starting to split at head of spine, with a few tiny pieces of cloth missing; cloth with slight bubbling across the top of the rear cover and down the spine; spine darkened (from repair?); a few minor scratch marks and dings to gilt edges. Front hinge cracked and repaired; front free endpaper becoming detached; small dark (oil?) stain upper in corner of front free endpaper, half-title, and blank recto of frontispiece. Text leaves slightly age-toned; a few faint stains or fox marks on title leaf; over-opened between pages 34 and 35; very slight diagonal crease in the upper margin of several leaves; small portion of lower corner of final advertisement leaf and rear free endpaper folded up. Lower portion of plate facing page 78 ("Scrooge's Third Visitor") becoming detached, with a quarter-inch horizontal tear and slight edge curling; lower inch of plate facing page 150 ("The Last of the Spirits") detached and curled slightly. Overall, a very good copy. Bookseller's ticket and old catalogue description mounted on front pastedown; pencil note in the gutter margin of the Preface leaf. Eckel, pages 110-115; Gimbel (Podeschi) A79; Ray, The Illustrator and the Book, 135 ("To be fully appreciated Leech's etchings should be seen in the first edition, the careful hand-coloring of which he directed himself"); Sadleir 684; Smith, Dickens, II, 4; William B. Todd, "Dickens's Christmas Carol," The Book Collector X (Winter 1961), pages 449-454.

    [Together with:] The Chimes. London: Chapman and Hall, 1845. First edition. [8], 175, [1, printer's imprint] pages. Steel-engraved frontispiece and vignette title, and eleven wood-engraved text illustrations. With an Autograph Note Signed by Richard Doyle to an unnamed recipient, 18 November, [n.y.]. [And:] The Cricket on the Hearth. London: Bradbury and Evans, 1846. First edition, first state of Oliver Twist advertisement. [8], 174, [2, ads] pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece and vignette title, and twelve wood-engraved text illustrations. With an Autograph Manuscript Leaf by the dedicatee, Lord Jeffery, [N. p., n. d.]. [And:] The Battle of Life. London: Bradbury & Evans 1846. First edition, second state of the vignette title (Todd C2, Eckel 2). [8], 175, [1, printer's imprint], [2, ads] pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece and vignette title, and eleven wood-engraved text illustrations. With an Autograph Letter Signed by John Leech to Henry Vizetelly, 8 November 1843. [And:] The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1848. First edition. [8], 188 pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece and vignette title on toned grounds, and fifteen woodcut text illustrations. With an Autograph Letter Signed by John Tenniel to Alexander Macmillan, 30 September 1880, declining a commission and recommending William Small. Together four small octavo volumes, in the original cloth decoratively stamped in gilt and blind, all edges gilt. Occasional wear and soiling. A very appealing set in very good condition. Individually chemised and housed together in a full red morocco gilt book back pull-off case. Smith, Dickens, II, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9. From the Collection of Daniel J. King.


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    Charles Dickens. [Christmas Books], comprising: A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. With Illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First edition, first issue, with the text uncorrected, "Stave I" as the first chapter heading, red and blue title-page dated 1843, blue half-title, and yellow endpapers. Small octavo (6.4375 x 4.0625 inches; 163 x 104 mm.). [2, half-title (verso blank)], [2, title (printer's imprint on verso)], [2, Preface (verso blank)], [2, Contents (verso blank)], 166, [2, advertisements ("Works of Mr. Charles Dickens")] pages. Four hand-colored steel-engraved plates, heightened with gum arabic, by and after John Leech (frontispiece and facing pages 25, 78, and 150), and four wood-engraved text illustrations by W. J. Linton after John Leech (on pages 37, 73, 119, and 164). Printer's imprint on verso of title-page and at foot of page 166: London: Bradbury and Evans, Printers, Whitefriars. Publisher's light reddish brown vertically-ribbed cloth. Covers decoratively stamped in blind with a single-line border enclosing a decorative border of holly and ivy; front cover decoratively lettered in gilt within a gilt wreath of holly leaves; spine lettered in gilt within an ornament of holly and mistletoe entwined with a curving banner; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. The binding matches Todd's first impression, second issue, first state, with the closest interval between the left blindstamped border and the left extremity of the gilt wreath measuring 13 mm. and with the upper serif of the "D" in "Dickens" unbroken. Just slightly skewed. Some areas of discoloration to cloth; corners lightly bumped, with fraying at tips, and bits of boards exposed; cloth at spine extremities chipped, with a little loss and fraying at foot; front joint starting to split at head of spine, with a few tiny pieces of cloth missing; cloth with slight bubbling across the top of the rear cover and down the spine; spine darkened (from repair?); a few minor scratch marks and dings to gilt edges. Front hinge cracked and repaired; front free endpaper becoming detached; small dark (oil?) stain upper in corner of front free endpaper, half-title, and blank recto of frontispiece. Text leaves slightly age-toned; a few faint stains or fox marks on title leaf; over-opened between pages 34 and 35; very slight diagonal crease in the upper margin of several leaves; small portion of lower corner of final advertisement leaf and rear free endpaper folded up. Lower portion of plate facing page 78 ("Scrooge's Third Visitor") becoming detached, with a quarter-inch horizontal tear and slight edge curling; lower inch of plate facing page 150 ("The Last of the Spirits") detached and curled slightly. Overall, a very good copy. Bookseller's ticket ("J. Walmsley, / Bookseller / 29 Church St. / Liverpool") and old catalogue description mounted on front pastedown; pencil note in the gutter margin of the Preface leaf: "C 11/2/28." Eckel, pages 110-115; Gimbel (Podeschi) A79; Ray, The Illustrator and the Book, 135 ("To be fully appreciated Leech's etchings should be seen in the first edition, the careful hand-coloring of which he directed himself"); Sadleir 684; Smith, Dickens, II, 4; William B. Todd, "Dickens's Christmas Carol," The Book Collector X (Winter 1961), pages 449-454.

    Tipped to front free endpaper is a Third Person Autograph Note Signed in the text by Charles Dickens to a Mr. [Bernard Henry?] Becker, "Tavistock House / Twenty Ninth November / 1856." Written in blue ink on blue paper. One page (recto of one octavo leaf), creased and folded at outer edge, with a short tear: "Mr Charles Dickens presents his / compliments to Mr Becker, and / begs to say that he has referred / Mr Becker's note to the author of / Sister Rose; in doing which his / power of interference in the matter / to which it refers, ends."

    This Note is published on page 220 in Volume Eight (1856-1858) of The Pilgrim Edition of The Letters of Charles Dickens, Edited by Graham Storey and Kathleen Tillotson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, [1995]); and again, corrected, on page 673 in Volume Twelve (1868-1870) of The Letters of Charles Dickens, Edited by Graham Storey [and Margaret Brown] (Oxford: Clarendon Press, [2002]), where "Mr. Becker" is identified in a note as "Probably Bernard Henry Becker (1833-1900), journalist and miscellaneous writer; on staff of Daily News; special commissioner in Sheffield and Manchester, 1878-9; in Ireland 1881; his books included Disturbed Ireland, 1881." "Sister Rose," a story in four parts, by Wilkie Collins was published in Household Words, in April and May, 1855.

    Bernard Henry Becker was one of the critics of Dickens's Hard Times (first published in 1854) who "protested against what they viewed as Dickens's disparagement of facts." Becker wrote: "despite the denunciation of political economy, which is nothing if not statistical, as the 'dismal science' and the unlovely portrait drawn of Mr. Gradgrind, the lover of facts-the errors into which the human intellect has been led by that great 'parent of error a priori' have been in modern times abundantly exposed by the stern logic facts. It would, be difficult to exaggerate the influence exercised by statistics at the present moment over every department of human thought'" (Robert McParland, Charles Dickens's American Audience ([Lanham, Maryland]: Lexington Books, [2010]), page 112).

    Additional notes state: "Extract in Anderson Galleries catalogue No. 2029 (1926)" (Lot 184 (on Monday Afternoon, February First, First Session, Numbers 1-253) in The Anderson Galleries, Sale Number 2029, February 1, 2, 3, 1926, The Autograph Collection Formed by the Late Col. James H. Manning. Part Two. New York: The Anderson Galleries, 1926); and that it was "mentioned in Sotheby's catalogue, 24 Feb 2000."

    [Together with:] Charles Dickens. The Chimes: A Goblin Story of Some Bells that Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year In. London: Chapman and Hall, 1845 [i.e., December 1844]. First edition, first state of the vignette title, with "Chapman & Hall" centered and slightly curved in the cloud at the foot of the engraved plate. Small octavo (6.4375 x 4.125 inches; 164 x 104 mm.). [2, advertisement for "A Christmas Carol" (verso blank)], [2, half-title (verso blank)], [2, title (printer's imprint on verso)], [2, list of illustrations (verso blank)], 175, [1, printer's imprint] pages. Steel-engraved frontispiece and added vignette title by F. P. Becker after Daniel Maclise, and eleven wood-engraved text illustrations by Groves, W. J. Linton, C. Gray, and the Dalziel Brothers, after Richard Doyle, John Leech, and Clarkson Stanfield. Printer's imprint on verso of title-page and on verso of final leaf: London: Bradbury and Evans, Printers, Whitefriars. Publisher's red vertically-ribbed cloth. Covers stamped in blind with a decorative border of vines, leaves, and flowers; front cover decoratively lettered in gilt beneath a pictorial design comprised of seven goblins above six chimes, with each letter of "Chimes" formed of the cloth on a separate chime; spine pictorially stamped in gilt with a design of three goblins above a bell with two hanging vines enclosing the gilt lettering; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. A few areas of slight discoloration to cloth; front cover darkened slightly around the edges; lower edge of front cover lightly bumped near front joint; corners very slightly bumped and rubbed, with cloth fraying and boards exposed at lower corners; board edges rubbed. Spine darkened slightly (from glue repairs?); spine ends softened and rubbed; front hinge cracked, with mull exposed; rear hinge cracked, but sound; rear pastedown blistered. Light foxing to frontispiece and added vignette title; occasional soiling and faint marginal smudging; a few minor paper imperfections. Generally, very clean internally. Bookseller's ticket ("H. Whitmore. / Market Street / Opposite the Talbot Inn / Manchester.") and old catalogue description mounted on front pastedown; three-line ink note erased from front pastedown; pencil note in the gutter margin of the list of illustrations leaf: "C 11/2/28."

    Eckel, pages 116-118; Ray, The Illustrator and the Book in England, 28 ("The frontispiece and engraved title page constitute Maclise's most elaborate composition in the fairy and goblin vein"); Gimbel (Podeschi) A86; Sadleir 683; Smith, Dickens, II, 5.

    Tipped to front free endpaper is an Autograph Note Signed by Richard Doyle to an unnamed recipient (identified in pencil in the upper left corner as Lord Tennyson), "54. Clifton. Gardens, / Maida Hill / Novr 18 [n.y.]," regarding a mistaken delivery of books. One page (recto of one octavo leaf), on half of a larger sheet of black-edged mourning stationery (torn edge at bottom), folded at outer edge. "My dear Sir, / By some mistake 'Enoch Arden' / has come to me instead of 'The King's [Idylls]'. / Y[our]s very Sincerely / R. Doyle / [flourish]."

    In 1864, artist, illustrator, and caricaturist Richard Doyle (1824-1883), moved with his father, John Doyle (1797-1868), and several siblings, from 17 Cambridge Terrace, now Sussex Gardens, to 54 Clifton Gardens, Maida Hill (see The Illustrated Letters of Richard Doyle to his Father, 1842-1843 (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 2016). In about 1850, Doyle had painted a portrait of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1882), and in March 1856, during a visit that Doyle and Tom Taylor had made to Farringford House, Doyle had done a drawing of the view from Tennyson's window ("View from the Drawing Room painted in 1856 by Richard Doyle").

    Tennyson's narrative poem Enoch Arden was first published in 1864. The Idylls of the King, a cycle of twelve narrative poems, was published between 1859 and 1885: beginning in 1859 with four idylls: "Enid," "Vivien," "Elaine," and "Guinevere;" followed in 1869 by the publication of "The Coming of Arthur," "The Holy Grail," "Pelleas and Ettarre," and "The Passing of Arthur;" in 1872, by "Gareth and Lynette" and "The Last Tournament"; and finally, in 1885 by "Balin and Balan."

    In a letter to the Duchess of Argyll from Farringford, dated March 8, 1859, Tennyson wrote: "I really do not know when 'King Arthur' is to come out...the Poems-there are four of them...finished and, for want of a better name to be called 'the King's Idylls'" (The Letters of Alfred Lord Tennyson, Volume II, 1851-1870, edited by Cecil Y. Lang and Edgar F. Shannon, Jr. (Cambridge, Massachusetts: 1987), pages 215-216).

    [And:] Charles Dickens. The Cricket on the Hearth. A Fairy Tale of Home. London: Printed and Published for the Author, by Bradbury and Evans, 1846 [i.e., December 1845]. First edition, first state of the advertisement leaf for Oliver Twist, with the two-line italic heading only on page [175]. Small octavo (approximately 6.5 x 4.125 inches; 164 x 105 mm.). [2, half-title (verso blank)], [2, title (printer's imprint on verso)], [2, dedication "To Lord Jeffrey" (verso blank)], [2, list of illustrations (verso blank)], 174, [2, advertisements] pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece by John Thompson and added vignette title by G. Dalziel, both after Daniel Maclise, and twelve wood-engraved text illustrations by the Dalziel Brothers, Thomas Williams, Swain, and Groves, after Richard Doyle, Clarkson Stanfield, John Leech, and Edwin Landseer. Publisher's red vertically-ribbed cloth. Covers decoratively stamped in blind with a floral, scissor-like border that has a square in each corner containing an open flower; front cover decoratively lettered and pictorially stamped in gilt with a detailed fireplace, with two words of the title formed of the cloth on the hearth; spine decoratively lettered and pictorially stamped in gilt with an oblong holly wreath that has a cricket at its top and a bow at its bottom; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. Possibly recased, or at least tightened, and with endpapers renewed; corner tips very slightly bumped and rubbed, with cloth fraying inside top corner of rear cover; spine darkened slightly and with a small dark spot just affecting the "T" in the first word of the title; spine ends softened and lightly rubbed; head of spine beginning to chip; gilt on front cover still bright, but lightly rubbed in a few places; gilt on spine a little rubbed and dull; a few small areas of discoloration to cloth, and a couple of tiny cloth bubbles; a few very slight dings and scratch marks to gilt edges. Front pastedown with large browned area (glue stain?) where something has been removed (no offsetting onto manuscript leaf or original preliminary leaves), and a couple of additional smaller stains; offsetting and two small stains on front free endpaper. First and last few leaves browned around the edges from turn-ins; over-opened between the first and second gatherings (title and dedication leaf); first gathering a little loose; a few leaves with tiny dings to lower edge; a few upper corner tips folded down; very slight creasing in upper margin of some leaves; knotted sewing thread between pages 56 and 57, resulting in very slight impressions on adjacent leaves (pages 49-66); occasional faint, mostly marginal, smudging; a few minor paper imperfections. Generally, very clean internally. Bookseller's ticket ("Wilson / Bookseller Stationer / and Binder, / 11, Royal Exchange.") and old catalogue description mounted on front pastedown; pencil note in lower outer corner of front pastedown: "1st Issue 1st Edn / Jany 31 08 / Anderson" (a copy of The Cricket on the Hearth is Lot 284 in The Anderson Galleries, January 30-31, 1908, The George M. Williamson Collection: Catalogue of the Extremely Choice Collection of First Editions of English and American Authors and Association Books Formed by George M. Williamson of Grand-View-on-Hudson). Pencil note in the upper gutter margin of the dedication leaf: " C 11/2/28." Eckel, pages 119-120. Gimbel (Podeschi) A92. Sadleir 685. Smith, Dickens, II, 6.

    Tipped to front free endpaper is an Autograph Manuscript Leaf by the dedicatee, Scottish judge and literary critic Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey (1773-1850), containing the text of two pages of his review of "Correspondance, Littéraire, Philosophique et Critique. Adressée à un Souverain d'Allemagne, depuis 1770 jusqu'à 1782. Par le Baron de Grimm, et par Diderot. 5 tomes, 8vo. pp. 2250. Paris: 1812 (July, 1813)" in his Contributions to the Edinburgh Review, Second Edition (London: Printed for Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1836), Volume I, pages 324-364. The leaf begins with the text of page 354, line 23 ("[the best thing, perhaps, that] we can do is to go on, boasting of the unparalleled excellence we have attained"), and continues to page 356, line 10 ("After having said too much [about the stage]"). Written in ink, two pages, recto and verso of one quarto leaf, folded to small octavo, each page numbered in ink "35" and "36" in the upper left corner, with "Lord Jeffrey" and "8" written in pencil added in a later hand in the upper left corner of recto. The leaf is stained, with small two holes, and is becoming detached.

    Dickens sent out the first of his presentation copies of A Christmas Carol on December 17, 1843. The official publication date was December 19, "and he was all out of books by December 22...[Lord Francis Jeffrey was] among those honored with author's copies just in time for the holidays. 'Blessings on your kind heart, my dear Dickens!' wrote Lord Francis Jeffrey [on 26 December 1843], 'and may it always be as light and full as it is kind, and a fountain of kindness to all within reach of its beatings! We are all charmed with your Carol, chiefly, I think, for the genuine goodness which breathes all through it, and is the true inspiring angel by which its genius has awakened....Well, you should be happy yourself, for you may be sure you have done more good, and not only fastened more kindly feelings, but prompted more positive acts of benevolence, by the little publication, than can be traced to all the pulpits and confessionals in Christendom, since Christmas 1842" (See Henry Cockburn, Lord Cockburn, Life of Lord Jeffrey, with a Selection from His Correspondence (Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1852), II, pages 300-302). "Dickens was so fond of [Lord Jeffrey] that he named his fifth child Francis Jeffrey Dickens (1844-1886) and dedicated the third Christmas Book, The Cricket on the Hearth (1845), to Lord Jeffrey." (Charles Dickens, The Annotated Christmas Carol. A Christmas Carol in Prose, Edited with an Introduction, Notes, and Bibliography by Michael Patrick Hearn (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, [2003]), pages xlviii-xlix: and Note 27).

    [And:] Charles Dickens. The Battle of Life. A Love Story. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1846. First edition, second state of the vignette title (Todd C2, Eckel 2), with "A Love Story" etched in viny letters on a scroll (not carried by a cupid) that is part of the plate, with the three-line imprint centered below, the "D" in "BRADBURY" broken. Small octavo (6.5 x 4.0625 inches; 166 x 104 mm.). [2, half-title (verso blank)], [2, title (printer's imprint on verso]), [2, dedication (verso blank)], [2, list of illustrations (verso blank)], 175, [1, printer's imprint], [2, advertisements] pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece and added vignette title by John Thompson after Daniel Maclise, and eleven wood-engraved text illustrations by the Dalziel Brothers (G. and E. Dalziel), Thomas Williams, and W. T. Green, after Richard Doyle, Clarkson Stanfield, John Leech, and Daniel Maclise. Original publisher's red horizontally-ribbed cloth. Covers decoratively stamped in blind with two double-line borders interspersed with twelve floral designs; front cover lettered in gilt and pictorially stamped in gilt with two cherubs about to battle while mounted on wasps above a decorative spray; spine lettered in gilt within a decorative design of an oval garland of leaves and flowers with a cherub on a wasp at top and bottom; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. Very slightly skewed; corners lightly bumped and rubbed; board exposed at lower corner of front cover; cloth fraying and tiny bits of board exposed at other corners; lower edge of rear cover bumped near spine; front cover with a shiny narrow adhesion (glue?), and a small stain near outer edge; gilt rubbed a little on front cover and spine; rear cover with cloth blistering at outer edge, and with two areas of white staining; spine ends softened and beginning to chip; rear pastedown blistering; front hinge cracked. Faint edge browning to first and last few leaves; slight browning and what appear to be vertical rust (?) stains across upper blank portion of illustrations leaf (from paper clips?); paper flaw (diagonal crease from outer edge and additional perpendicular crease) to upper corner of pages 27/28, just affecting page numbers; slight diagonal crease in upper corner several additional leaves; small faint stain or fox mark in lower margin pages [55] and 64; browning lower margin of pages 158-159. Generally, quite clean internally. With a Charles Dickens Centenary Testimonal Stamp, "A Tribute to Genius, 1812 1912," mounted on front pastedown. Pencil note on recto of rear free endpaper: "'Young.' 16. Augt. 1923. 1, Vol. 1st Edition / 1st Issue ([?]/-/-)"; pencil note in the gutter margin of the dedication leaf: "C 11/2/28." Eckel, pages 121-123. Gimbel (Podeschi) A116. Sadleir 681. Smith, Dickens, II, 8. William B. Todd, "Dickens's Battle of Life: Round Six," The Book Collector XV (Spring 1966), pages 48-54.

    Tipped to front free endpaper is an Autograph Letter Signed by John Leech (1817-1864) to Henry Vizetelly, "November 8th 1843 / 9 Powis Place / Queen Square." Octavo, two-and-a-half pages, folded. "My dear Sir, / I have not yet done / any thing in the / Album - I have been / so busy, and for the / last week, so unwell, / but, I dare say that / between this, and / [few?] days time I may / be able to jot down / some vagaries, if that / will serve your / [tome?]." On the verso of the second page is neatly written in ink in a different hand: "Leech J / Novr 8/43."

    Henry Vizetelly (1820-1894) was the "editor and part proprietor of the Illustrated Times...who in youth, had been a distinguished engraver on wood (The Life and Adventures of George Augustus Sala, 1896). "[Vizetelly] engraved several of John Leech's first successful drawings, Paris Originals, for Bell's Life and sold sketches of the coronation of Queen Victoria to Bell's Life and The Observer" (Oxford DNB Online).

    "In July1843 he began a series of 'Cartoons', full-page subjects satirizing the Westminster Hall murals. The name stuck and so Leech effectively gave to the English language the meaning of 'cartoon' as a large satirical print. For the next twenty years he produced hundreds of brilliant and incisive sporting and domestic illustrations for the weekly magazine. They were collected together as Pictures of Life and Character (1854-69) and reissued again in the 1880s. Leech created a dramatis personae of lovable characters who were instantly recognizable to the Victorian public...Leech was also making a name as an illustrator of contemporary fiction, mostly by secondary writers...He brought his own drolleries to Hood's Comic Annual and the children's book Jack the Giant Killer (both 1843)...Leech's greatest opportunity to work with a substantial author came with Charles Dickens's Christmas books (1843-8). His illustrations to A Christmas Carol (1843) remain the most enduring images of this classic" (Oxford DNB Online).

    "A Tribute to Genius, 1812-1912," testimonial stamp devised by the Charles Dickens Centenary Testimonial Committee. Includes full sheet of stamps, original housing for stamps, and artwork from the Strand Magazine, circa 1911. "Engraved and printed by Raphael Tuck & Sons, the Strand Magazine issued these cinderella labels at the cost of 1d in England and 2c in the United States. These purely commemorative items are often mailed along with regular stamps, but are not considered valid postage. The housing for the stamps specifically encourages the owner to affix each as a 'Centenary Book Plate in every volume you possess of the works of Charles Dickens for the purpose of raising a fund for the benefit of his descendents [sic], and, should the proceeds permit, of in other ways commemorating his memory" ("Dickens at 200: 1812-2012," An Exhibit in Special Collections, University of Delaware Library, at http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/exhibits/dickens/characters.html).

    [And:] Charles Dickens. The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain. A Fancy for Christmas-Time. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1848. First edition. Small octavo (6.5 x 4 inches; 165 x 103 mm.). [2, publisher's advertisements], [2, title (printer's imprint on verso)], [2, list of illustrations (verso blank)], [2, fly-title (verso blank)], 188 pages. Wood-engraved frontispiece and added vignette title on toned grounds by Martin & Corbould after John Tenniel, and fifteen wood-engraved text illustrations by Martin & Corbould, Thomas Williams, Smith & Cheltnam, and the Dalziel Brothers, after John Tenniel, Clarkson Stanfield, Frank Stone, and John Leech. Publisher's red vertically-ribbed cloth; covers stamped in blind with a fancy decorative border; front cover pictorially stamped in gilt with a Christmas wreath enclosing gilt lettering; spine pictorially stamped in gilt with an ornament of leaves and berries interlaced with a ribbon which, except for two words in gilt not on the ribbon, contains the title and author's name formed of the cloth; all edges gilt; pale yellow coated endpapers. Slightly skewed; corners rubbed, with cloth fraying and boards exposed, with cloth folded up to pastedown at lower corner of front cover; board edges lightly rubbed; spine ends softened and lightly rubbed, with a few chips; short split (quarter-inch) to lower spine at front joint, with tiny piece of cloth missing, and another (three-eighths-inch) at rear joint; small stains and slight discoloration to cloth; a bit of recoloring possible at head of spine near rear joint; gilt on spine dulled slightly; front hinge repaired; rear hinge cracked, but firm (mull cloth visible); outer edge of front free endpaper with a few tiny tears and creases. Light offsetting from a few wood-engraving to facing pages; a few upper corners creased; occasional marginal smudging and a few small stains; paper flaw (small dark spot in the text) on pages 171/172; pencil mark in the text on page 64; pencil note in the gutter margin of the illustrations leaf: "C 11/2/28." Eckel, pages 124-125. Gimbel (Podeschi) A119. Sadleir 690. Smith, Dickens, II, 9.

    Tipped to front free endpaper is an Autograph Letter Signed by John Tenniel to Alexander Macmillan, "10 Portsdown Road. / Septr. 30. 1880," refusing to execute a commission and recommending William Small (1843-1929. Octavo, two-and-a-half pages, folded; fold tears. "I am very sorry / to have again to tell you / that I cannot possibly / undertake the illustrations / you propose - & for the / reasons that I gave in / my previous letter. / You surely cannot suppose / that my objection arises / from any feeling of perverse- / ness, or a determination / to disoblige - that of course / is too absurd. It is simply / this. I had so much trouble / in getting rid of the fetters / of 'book illustration' - & having / accomplished it at last - I have no sort of inclination / to put them on again. / If I had not given it up / entirely, the fact that [Mrs?]: / Kingsley desires it would / of itself have been sufficient - / as I need hardly say - to / secure my very earnest / co-operation in the work. / Mr: W. Small is the man / for you. He is a most / accomplished artist & / illustrator & his address is - / 294. Camden Road / Believe me to remain / in an agony of haste[?]. / Yours very sincerely / [flourish] / John Tenniel. / I have been out of town - / backwards & forwards - / for the last fortnight."

    After completing the fifty illustrations for Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, which was published in December 1871, John Tenniel "almost entirely gave up book illustration. Tenniel was exceedingly busy with his work for Punch. He was named chief artist in 1864 following the death of John Leech and he began to produce the 'big cut' - a full-page cartoon - each week" (Edward Wakeling, Lewis Carroll: The Man and His Circle (London: I.B. Taurus, [2005]), page 86).

    Mrs. Kingsley is most likely Charles Kingsley's wife, Frances Eliza "Fanny" Grenfell Kingsley (1814-1891).

    Together five small octavo volumes. Each volume protected in a red cloth chemise and the five volumes housed together in a handsome deep red morocco five-volume book back pull-off case, with spines decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, with date of each volume in gilt at foot of spine. Some light wear to pull-off case.



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