Description

    An Important Incunable Edition of Duns Scotus

    [Thomas Penketh, editor]. Johannes Duns Scotus. Quaestiones in quattor libros Sententiarum. [Part II]. [Bound with]: Quodlibeta. Venice: Johannes de Colonia and Johann Manthen, 1478, 7 January and 1477, 7 October. Two titles in one folio volume. Approximately 11 x 7 inches. a10, b-e8, f-g6, h-l8, 10, m-mm10, n-p8, q10, r8, s6. Complete with blank. a10, b-e8, f6, ff6, g-k8, l-m10. [lacking b5, text leaf -- with blank inserted incorrectly before b4 and m10 blank.] First initial letter in contemporary manuscript and decorated in red ink, a few leaves rubricated. Nineteenth century half vellum over paper- boards, ink title to spine. Some rubbing and minor wear to binding, contemporary ownership inscription of "Brother Antonius d'Asralo OM" on blank before first title-page, and on last leaf of second work, also ownership inscription of Franciscan library at foot of first text leaf. Some contemporary marginalia. Overall, a very fine, crisp copy with ample margins.
    John Duns Scotus (c.1265 - 1308), Franciscan friar and theologian. The great commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard contains most of Scotus' important contributions to Medieval scholastic philosophy. These volumes are based on his Oxford Lectures and are sometimes referred to as the Opus Oxoniense. Each of the volumes stands alone.
    "It was part of the duty of a regent master to conduct quodlibetal disputations, so called because 'they could be about any topic whatever (de quodlibet) and could be initiated by any member of the audience (a quodlibet).' Scotus's quodlibetal Questiones were disputed in either Advent 1306 or Lent 1307. Scotus then revised the questions, completing the revision up through the last question, q 12." (Cambridge Companion To Duns Scotus).
    Volume II, XI-XIII includes Bartholomaeus de Bellatis' Additiones.
    Quaestiones: Goff D379. Hain/Copinger 6416*. Pell 4451. Hillard 753. Girard 174. Lefèvre 163. Parguez 392. Péligry 314. Polain(B) 1353. IDL 1638. IBE 2197. IGI 3598. IBP 1993. Saj--Soltész 1211. Mendes 443, 447. Voull(Trier) 1862. Voull(B) 3752. Ohly-Sack 1052. Sack(Freiburg) 1300. L kkös(Cat BPU) 175. Walsh 1694. Rhodes (Oxford Colleges) 710. Pr 4324, 4315 (I,III,IV); BMC XII 16. BSB-Ink D-309. GW 9073. ISTC id00379000.
    Quodlibeta: Goff D393. Hain/Copinger 6434*. Pell 4467. Hillard 754. Aquilon 268. Péligry 316. IBE 2189. IGI 3593. Girard 176 . Polain(B) 1361. IBP 1988. IJL 129. Mendes 439. Ernst (Hildesheim) I, I 172. Günt(L) 3321. Voull(Trier) 1859. Voull(B) 3751,5. Ohly-Sack 1046. Sack(Freiburg) 1293. Walsh 1699. Rhodes (Oxford Colleges) 717. Sheppard 3490. Bodleian D162. Proctor 4320. BMC V 228. BSB-Ink D-318. GW 9068. ISTC id003930000. From the Krown & Spellman Collection.
    Please visit HA.com/6117 for an extended description of this lot.


    More Information:

    Duns Scotus, Johannes. Quaestiones in quattor libros Sententiarum. Part 2. [Bound with] Quodlibeta. Venice: Johannes de Colonia & Johann Manthen, 1478, 7 January & 1477, 7 October. Folio. 2 works in 1 volume. a10, b-e8, f-g6, h-l8, 10, m-mm10, n-p8, q10, r8, s6. Complete with blank. a10, b-e8, f6, ff6, g-k8, l-m10. [lacking b5, text leaf -- with blank inserted incorrectly before b4 & m10 blank.] 19th century vellum-backed paper- boards,fore-edge rubbed; title in old hand; contemporary ownership inscription of "Brother Antonius d'Asralo OM" on blank before first t.p. and on last leaf of second work, also ownership inscription of Franciscan library at foot of first text leaf; some contemp. marginalia; a very fine crisp copy with ample margins. First initial letter in contemp. manuscript and decorated in red ink, a few leaves rubricated.

    Duns Scotus, John (c.1265 - 1308), Franciscan friar and theologian. The great commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard contains most of Scotus' important contributions to Medieval scholastic philosophy. These volumes are based on his Oxford Lectures and are sometimes referred to as the Opus Oxoniense. Each of the volumes stands alone.

    "It was part of the duty of a regent master to conduct quodlibetal disputations, so called because Ôthey could be about any topib whatever (de quodlibet) and could be initiated by any member of the audience (a quodlibet). Scotus's quodlibetal Questiones were disputed in either Advent 1306 or Lent 1307. Scotus then revised the questions, completing the revision up through the last question, q12." [Cambridge Companion To Duns Scotus]

    "Though less extensive in scope (than the commentary on the Sentences), Scotus' Quaestiones Quodlibetales are almost as important; they express his most mature thinking as regent master at Paris." [Ency. of Philosophy]

    Penketh, Thomas (d. 1487), Augustinian friar and theologian, describes himself in his theological notebook as of the Warrington convent in Lancashire, and evidently studied theology at Oxford before (probably immediately before) 1466; on the basis of his Oxford study he was granted leave to incept at Cambridge in the academic year 1466 - 7, and took the degree of DTh on 31 May 1468. He must have already had some repute within his order, since he was confirmed as prior provincial of England on 22 October 1469; but he evidently returned to Oxford, where he was permitted by his order to study and teach, until in 1474 he vacated the provincialship to study at Padua. He was appointed lector in metaphysics in the university there, almost certainly being the Master Thomas Anglicus confirmed in that post on 22 September 1475, and very probably holding it already in 1474, when he published in Venice his edition of the quodlibetal questions of John Duns Scotus. By 1477, when he brought out an edition of Scotus's commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, he was holding the post of lector in theology, which he still held in 1479 according to his confrère, Brother Iacopo Filippo da Bergamo. He was re-elected prior provincial in 1480 (confirmed 15 March 1481) and again on 1 April 1485, presumably until death. At Easter 1484 he preached a sermon in praise of Richard III, which, according to Sir Thomas More, was afterwards excoriated, but which brought him an annual pension of £10 from the king. He died in London on 20 May 1487.

    Penketh's principal achievement was to be the first to publish scholarly but usable printed editions of the chief works of Duns Scotus and the Scotist theologian Antonius Andreae. His editorial work was crowded into the five or six years he spent at Padua, where he could be in touch with experienced printers; but it originated in the Scotist teaching of the Oxford and Cambridge theological faculties, as a surviving notebook in his hand shows (Oxford, Corpus Christi College, MS 126). It contains questions on universals by Brother William Russell, probably the Augustinian friar who incepted at Oxford in 1430, some unattributed questions on God and creatures, possibly Penketh's own, and a text of the commentary of Antonius Andreae on Aristotle's Metaphysics which he edited at Padua. All these texts are explicitly Scotist, one of the unascribed questions citing Scotus as doctor noster subtilis; together, they provide evidence of the theology taught at the Oxford Augustinian house from the 1430s to the 1470's, and of the Scotist learning that lay behind Penketh's editions of Scotus and Antonius Andreae. The editions ascribed to him are Scotus's Quaestiones quodlibetales, printed by Albert de Stendal (Padua, 1474), with the text emended by Penketh, and printed again from Penketh's text for Johann of Cologne (Venice, 1477) and reissued both in Nuremberg and in Venice in 1481; Scotus's Quaestiones super secundum librum sententiarum, printed by Stendal and emended by Penketh (Padua, 1474); Antonius Andreae's Quaestiones de tribus principiis rerum naturalium, printed by Laurentius Canozius and emended by Penketh and Laurentius de Lendenaria (Padua, 1475); Scotus's Quaestiones super libros sententiarum, edited by Penketh with Bartolomeo Bellati and printed for Johann of Cologne and Nicholas Jenson (Venice, 1477, and reissued there in both folio and quarto editions in 1481); Antonius Andreae's Quaestiones super "Metaphysica," printed for Nicholas Petri of Haarlem and emended by Penketh (Vicenza, 1477, and reissued in London for William Wilcock in 1480). These editions, especially of Scotus, circulated widely and for some time were the standard texts; they were made more useful by the inclusion of the early additamenta of Scotus's pupils which some editors omitted.

    Volume 2 XI-XIII includes Bartholomaeus de Bellatis' Additiones.

    Quaestiones: Goff D379. Hain/Copinger 6416*. Pell 4451. Hillard 753. Girard 174. Lefèvre 163. Parguez 392. Péligry 314. Polain(B) 1353. IDL 1638. IBE 2197. IGI 3598. IBP 1993. Saj--Soltész 1211. Mendes 443, 447. Voull(Trier) 1862. Voull(B) 3752. Ohly-Sack 1052. Sack(Freiburg) 1300. L kkös(Cat BPU) 175. Walsh 1694. Rhodes (Oxford Colleges) 710. Pr 4324, 4315 (I,III,IV); BMC XII 16. BSB-Ink D-309. GW 9073. ISTC id00379000.

    Quodlibeta: Goff D393. Hain/Copinger 6434*. Pell 4467. Hillard 754. Aquilon 268. Péligry 316. IBE 2189. IGI 3593. Girard 176 . Polain(B) 1361. IBP 1988. IJL 129. Mendes 439. Ernst (Hildesheim) I, I 172. Günt(L) 3321. Voull(Trier) 1859. Voull(B) 3751,5. Ohly-Sack 1046. Sack(Freiburg) 1293. Walsh 1699. Rhodes (Oxford Colleges) 717. Sheppard 3490. Bodleian D162. Proctor 4320. BMC V 228. BSB-Ink D-318. GW 9068. ISTC id003930000.



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