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    Description

    Franklin D. Roosevelt: Typed Letter Signed as President.
    -March 11, 1938. Washington, D.C. One page. 7" x 9". White House letterhead.
    -To: Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins, Washington, D.C.
    -Fold, a few small ink stains, else very good.

    FDR writes "I have your letter of March fifth in support of the Small Claims Court Act (S. 1835)./ I was pleased to approve the measure. It will assist in securing justice for persons having small claims who are financially unable to retain counsel. It is also a move in the general direction of simplification of legal procedure." Frances Perkins (1882-1965), whose original name was Fannie Coralie Perkins, was United States Secretary of Labor during the Presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt . Besides being the first woman to be appointed to a cabinet post, she also served one of the longest terms of any Roosevelt appointee (1933-1945).


    More Information:

    The extended description below was supplied by the consignor. We are making it available to our web bidders who are interested in more in-depth research and broader historical perspective. Please note that presentation (i.e. framing), lot divisions, and interpretations of condition and content may occasionally differ from our descriptions. Assertions of fact and subjective observations contained in this description represent the opinion of the consignor. These remarks have not been checked for accuracy by Heritage Auctions, and we assume no responsibility for their accuracy; they are offered purely to allow the bidder insight into the way the consignor has viewed the item(s) in question. No right of return or claim of lack of authenticity or provenance based upon this extended description will be granted.

     

    A tremendous and historically significant March 11, 1938 signed letter on The White House Washington stationery from FDR to his Secretary of Labor, Frances Perkins on FDR's support of the Small Claims Court Act, with very special content. FDR writes: "My dear Madam Secretary:/ I have your letter of March fifth in support of the Small Claims Court Act (S. 1835)./ I was pleased to approve the measure. It will assist in securing justice for persons having small claims who are financially unable to retain counsel. It is also a move in the general direction of simplification of legal procedure./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." Wow! Frances Perkins (1882-1965), whose original name was Fannie Coralie Perkins, was United States Secretary of Labor during the Presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt . Besides being the first woman to be appointed to a cabinet post, she also served one of the longest terms of any Roosevelt appointee (1933–1945). Perkins graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1902 and for some years taught school and served as a social worker. She worked briefly with Jane Addams at Hull House in Chicago and then resumed her studies, first at the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce of the University of Pennsylvania and then at Columbia University, where she took an M.A. in social economics in 1910. From that year until 1912 she was executive secretary of the Consumers' League of New York. In that position she lobbied successfully for improved wages and working conditions, especially for women and children. From 1912 to 1917 she was executive secretary of the New York Committee on Safety and from 1917 to 1919 executive director of the New York Council of Organization for War Service. She was appointed in 1919 to New York's State Industrial Commission by Governor Alfred E. Smith, and in 1923 she was named to the State Industrial Board, of which she became chairman in 1926. Smith's successor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, appointed Perkins state industrial commissioner in 1929. She was, both before and after the onset of the Great Depression of the 1930s, a strong advocate of unemployment insurance and close government supervision of fiscal policy. When FDR entered the presidency in 1933 he named Perkins secretary of labor, making her the first woman to serve in a cabinet position. After the initial controversy of her appointment died away she settled into a twelve-year term of effective administration of her department. She pushed for a minimum wage and maximum workweek, a limit on employment of children under 16, creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps , and unemployment compensation, all of which were enacted. She helped draft the Social Security Act and supervised the Fair Labor Standards Act (1938). When the focus of labor activity shifted in the late 1930s from government to unions, Perkins played a less visible role. Her most important work was then the building up of the Department of Labor, particularly the strengthening of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Two months after FDR's death, Perkins resigned from the Cabinet, but she remained in government as a United States civil service commissioner until 1953. From then until her death, she lectured on the problems of labor and industry. In 1934 she published People at Work, and The Roosevelt I Knew, a record of her association with the late president, appeared in 1946. A fabulous letter with interesting and historic content from the President of the United States to his Secretary of Labor. A fabulous letter to Secretary Perkins from FDR regarding the establishment of a major piece of judicial reform with special implication for persons "who are financially unable to retain counsel."



    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    June, 2008
    7th Saturday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 5
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
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