Description

    Franklin D. Roosevelt: Major Historic Archive of Forty Signed Letters, including an Autograph Letter Signed entirely in FDR's own hand. There are thirty-nine other Typed Letters Signed "Franklin D. Roosevelt" or "FDR", two additional letters bearing secretarial proxy signatures, as well as two letters written by FDR's secretaries and key advisors, including Colonel Louis McHenry Howe, four other related correspondences, eleven Western Union and Postal Telegraph telegrams from FDR, and two invitations, one to FDR's second inauguration as Governor of New York on January 1, 1931, with a separate invitation to the luncheon to follow the inauguration in Albany, New York. The letters were written to Mr. John S. "Major" Cohen (1870-1935), United States Senator and Editor of the Atlanta Journal between the critical years of 1921 to 1934. Most are evenly toned, else near fine.

    This was a span of time beginning when FDR was inflicted by poliomyelitis, through the period he discovered and then developed the rehabilitation center at Warm Springs, Georgia to the southwest of Atlanta, as well as the period FDR re-emerged politically as both Governor of New York and ultimately President of the United States. The letters are generally on personal, Executive Mansion Albany, and White House letterhead. This one of a kind primary source document collection is a rich political correspondence with an important newspaper editor in what FDR calls in one of his signed letters "my other state" of Georgia.

    An important correspondence with a key Southern political figure, John S. Cohen was a United States Senator from Georgia. Born in Augusta, Georgia, he was educated at private schools in Augusta, the Richmond Academy, and Shenandoah Valley Academy at Winchester, Virginia. He attended the United States Naval Academy in 1885 and 1886, and became a newspaper reporter for the New York World in 1886. During the Spanish-American War, he served as a war correspondent for the Atlanta Journal, and subsequently enlisted and served in the Third Georgia Volunteer Infantry, attaining the rank of major. He was a member of the army of occupation in Cuba, and was president and editor of the Atlanta Journal from 1917 to 1935. He was vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1932 to 1935. Cohen was appointed on 1932 to the United States Senate as a Democrat to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William J. Harris. Cohen served from April 25, 1932 to January 11, 1933. He was not a candidate in 1932 to fill the vacancy, and continued his former business activities until his death in Atlanta.


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    Franklin D. Roosevelt major historic archive of FORTY signed letters, including an autographed letter signed entirely in FDR's own hand, thirty nine other typed letters signed by FDR, two additional letters bearing secretarial proxy signatures, as well as two letters written by FDR's secretaries and key advisors, including Colonel Louis McHenry Howe, four other related correspondences, eleven Western Union and Postal Telegraph telegrams from FDR, and two invitations, one to FDR's second inauguration as Governor of New York on January 1, 1931, with a separate invitation to the luncheon to follow the inauguration in Albany, New York, to Mr. John S. "Major" Cohen (1870-1935), United States Senator and Editor of the Atlanta Journal, signed "Franklin D. Roosevelt" or "FDR," between the critical years of 1921 to 1934, a span of time beginning when FDR was inflicted by poliomyelitis, through the period he discovered and then developed the rehabilitation center at Warm Springs, Georgia to the southwest of Atlanta, as well as the period FDR re-emerged politically as both Governor of New York and ultimately President of the United States. Together this unbelievably precious historic treasure trove is 62 pages, 4tos and 8vos, on personal, Executive Mansion Albany and The White House Washington stationery. This one of a kind primary source document collection during a critical thirteen year time span between FDR and the editor of a major American newspaper outside of Warm Springs, Georgia, comprises the following treasures: one undated ALS FDR to Cohen; thirty nine TLS FDR to Cohen, including one as President of the United States; ten printed telegrams FDR to Cohen; one TLS from Colonel Louis McHenry Howe to Cohen; two TLS from FDR with secretarial proxy signatures; two printed invitations; one TLS from FDR's Gubernatorial secretary Guernsey Cross; and two secretarial carbons. This vast historical FDR document archive is Southern politics at its finest, and an excellent archive chronicling FDR's personal rehabilitation from polio and his successful political career that emerged later in the 1920s and early 1930s. A rich political correspondence with an important newspaper editor in what FDR calls in one of his signed letters "my other state" of Georgia. This precious documentary archive traces FDR's rise from poliomyelitis patient, to Governor of New York, ultimately to FDR's successful victory and first term as President of the United States. The signed letters by FDR are sprinkled with interesting and historic content. The correspondence begins just two months before FDR was infected by the polio virus, May 31, 1921, long before Warm Springs was on his mind, when Georgia was just another Southern state to FDR, writing to Cohen to ask him to serve as Chairman of the Georgia Committee for Lighthouses for the Blind in which FDR mentions many prominent Republicans in his letter, from then sitting President Warren G. Harding to William Howard Taft, Elihu Root, Herbert Hoover and Charles Evans Hughes. Two letters in this magnificent and important FDR Archive were written to Cohen on October 21, 1924, during FDR's very first visit to Warm Springs, Georgia, in which FDR refers to "this delightful State" that he was just becoming acquainted with, and the "opportunity of making a great many more friends" down in Georgia. Shortly after winning election as Governor of New York, on November 19, 1928 writes to Cohen: "Apparently my election is confirmed by the latest returns. I wish much that I could come to Atlanta when Governor Smith stops over but it is absolutely impossible, as I have and shall have such a short time at Warm Springs that I cannot miss a single day of exercising." FDR makes another reference to his physical disability on May 6, 1929 when he writes to Cohen: "When I accepted the nomination for Governorship, the doctor in charge forced a promise from me that I should accept no invitations to leave Warm Springs during my all too short visit here this Spring." On Presidential politics, October 8, 1928, FDR writes: "It looks to me as if we have a splendid chance of carrying New York for both the National and State tickets." He was right on the latter prediction, as he indeed won the Governor's race in 1928, but the head of the Democratic ticket, Alfred E. Smith, went down both in his native State of New York as well as across the Nation, losing in a landslide to Herbert Hoover. A February 11, 1932 letter discusses the requirements for getting on the ballot for the Georgia Democratic Presidential primary: "I do not need to assure you or the people of Georgia of my deep personal affection for what I consider ‘my other State.'  I have spent so much time there during the last few years that I could not fail to hold a deep affection for it and its people...I am today writing Miss Stella Akin...formally entering my name in the forthcoming primaries." A TLS as President, August 19, 1933, after the famed Hundred Days had ended, has FDR declining to "talk at the christening" for Cohen's grandchild: "I wish I could...but I simply cannot. Won't a little message to be read answer the purpose? I will be happy to send one." Several letters touch on FDR's cautious relations with several Southern Democratic political clubs. For example, on August 24, 1931, FDR expresses his concern about "their standing" and "whether our friends were in control of their activities." FDR urges one Southern Democratic club be taken over by party regulars and "run on conservative lines." An important correspondence with a key Southern political figure. John S. Cohen (February 26, 1870 to May 13, 1935) was a United States Senator from Georgia. Born in Augusta, Georgia, he was educated at private schools in Augusta, the Richmond Academy, and Shenendoah Valley Academy at Winchester, Virginia. He attended the United States Naval Academy in 1885 and 1886, and became a newspaper reporter for the New York World in 1886. He was secretary to Secretary of the Interior Hoke Smith from 1893 to 1896, and was a member of the press galleries of the United States Congress from 1893 to 1897. During the Spanish-American War, he served as a war correspondent for the Atlanta Journal, and subsequently enlisted and served in the Third Georgia Volunteer Infantry, attaining the rank of major. He was a member of the army of occupation in Cuba, and was president and editor of the Atlanta Journal from 1917 to 1935. He originated the plan for the national highway from New York City to Jacksonville, Florida, and was vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1932 to 1935. Cohen was appointed on April 25, 1932 to the United States Senate as a Democrat to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William J. Harris and served from April 25, 1932 to January 11, 1933, when a successor was duly elected and qualified. He was not a candidate in 1932 to fill the vacancy, and continued his former business activities until his death in Atlanta. Interment was in West View Cemetery, Atlanta. Together 58 items. A description of each item in this historic and important FDR correspondence between 1921 and 1934 follows. (1) Date: Undated, on  Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland letterhead, written entirely in FDR's own hand: "Warm Springs/ Saturday/ Dear Major –/ Thanks for your wire – 8:30 p.m. is all right and I take it I can finish and leave by 9:30?/ I have no photo!/ I will try to write out something longhand but have no stenographer here. I will send you about 1500 words on Monday – will you have it copied and sent to the other papers and to the press associations?/ Sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (2) Date: Undated memorandum to the Honorable J. S. Cohen: "What should I reply to this? I know nothing about the committee./ FDR." (3) Date: May 31, 1921, on Committee for Lighthouses for the Blind letterhead (listing President Warren G. Harding as Honorary Chairman, FDR as Chairman, Lewis L. Clarke as Treasurer, Secretary of the Treasury Andrew E. Mellon as Honorary Treasurer, Miss Winifred Holt as Founder, and Lupton A. Wilkinson as Executive Secretary): "Dear Major Cohen:/ In reaching your decision as to the acceptance of the state chairmanship offered to you by President Warren G. Harding, Honorary Chairman of the Committee for Lighthouses for the Blind, Mr. Lewis L. Clarke, President of the American Exchange National Bank, who is Treasurer of the Campaign, and I, feel that you would like to have the information which caused us to determine that we had no choice in regard to serving this movement./ These briefly are the facts:/ 1. The work was founded more than 15 years ago by Miss Winifred Holt, under the name of the New York Association for the Blind;/ 2. The early growth of the institution was aided unsparingly by such men as William Howard Taft, Elihu Root, Charles E. Hughes, the late Joseph H. Choate and the late Grover Cleveland;/ 3. The Association work has always been along lines calculated to lessen rather than increase the number of charity wards. The constant thought has been to equip blind people to make themselves wholly, or at least in part, self-supporting;/ 4. The work in the United States as well as in the rest of the world calls urgently for expansion at this time because the war has left society not only with an increased number of blind, but with a type of blind man, needing training, much higher in intelligence and possibilities than was ever before the case; 5. $2,000,000 is required to continue and enlarge the Lighthouse work in America, France and Italy./ 6. The Committee earnestly desires that this money shall be secured with as little as possible of ‘drive' methods./ The amount needed is not large in comparison with the great financial campaigns that America has sustained for numerous charitable enterprises, but surely no work could be of more genuine human appeal or more unquestionably a stewardship incumbent on all of us./ It is not our belief that it would be wise to launch the intensive part of the campaign at the beginning of the summer, but in order that the effort may be carried to a sharp, successful, and inexpensive conclusion in the fall, it seems imperative to perfect as much as possible of the campaign organization at this time. The same publicity people who handled the Hoover Child Feeding Program will send out moderate amounts of educational news stories during the summer and the State Chairman will be given every kind of cooperation, publicity and otherwise, in our power./ Based upon the receipts of recent large campaigns a seemingly logical quota for the State of Georgia would be $15,000.00. This amount is subject entirely to acceptance or rejection by such a committee as you, as State Chairman, would form. We do not feel that it would be a burden on the people of your state, and we believe that you will derive great deal of personal satisfaction from making the effort a success./ Mr. Clarke and I await with interest your ideas on how the campaign should be conducted from a national standpoint and from the standpoint of the State of Georgia./ Very truly yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt/ National Chairman." (4) Date: October 21, 1924, during FDR's very first visit to Warm Springs, Georgia, three weeks to the day after he and his wife Eleanor Roosevelt first arrived at Warm Springs, Georgia, written from Warm Springs on personal letterhead: "My dear Mr. Cohen:/ That is a very nice editorial in yesterday's Journal. I greatly appreciate it and I certainly reciprocate the thought that I may have the opportunity of making a great many more friends in this delightful State. Everyone throughout this section has been more than kind to me and I am certainly coming back next spring for another sojourn at Warm Springs./ I am sorry not to have had the opportunity of seeing you this time but you must run down here and visit me next April. In the meantime if you are in New York at any time during the winter do be sure to let me know./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (5) Date: October 24, 1924, also during FDR's very first visit to Warm Springs, Georgia, written from Warm Springs on personal letterhead on the eve of his first departure from Warm Springs: "My dear Mr. Cohen:/ I much wish that I could see you in Atlanta before I go back. I am leaving tomorrow and had hoped to be able to spend several hours in Atlanta on my way through, but I could not get accommodations on the train I wanted and therefore have to go straight through without stopping off. However, the next time you are in New York you must surely let me know as I want to talk over many things with you. I expect to return here April 1st for another month in this wonderful swimming pool./ I  inclose a short statement as you suggested. I am really convinced that Davis has a chance and that even if he does not get 266 votes in the electoral college, Coolidge won't either!/ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (6) Date: April 20, 1925, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on personal letterhead: "My dear Major Cohen:/ I would be awfully glad if I could have a talk with you before I go back on May 5th. Can't you run down to Warm Springs for the day? I wish I could put you up over night but I have no room in this small cottage./ I am also dropping a line to Hollins Randolph. Why don't you both come down together? It would be fine to see you./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (7) Date: April 25, 1925, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on personal letterhead: "My dear Major Cohen:/ It will be delightful to see you and Mr. Randolph. Drop me a line or telephone before you come so that I can be ready for you. You must, of course, lunch with me and stay to supper if you can./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (8) Date: June 7, 1927, on The Georgia Warm Springs Hotel Cottages Pools letterhead: "My dear Major:/ I have to return to New York before having a chance to see you and therefore must write to you in regard to the following./ We are opening the new Warm Springs golf course in the latter part of July. At this formal opening there will be present by invitation representative golfers, officials and sport writers from all the golf clubs and the important papers of Georgia. We want to make this a truly representative Georgia opening, and in this connection want to have Bobby Jones, Watts Gunn, and two other representative Georgia golfers play an exhibition match. Knowing of the influence that O. B. Keeler has with Bobby Jones, I would like to get his interest, and to get him to speak to Jones and urge him to come. I will be here myself at that time./ The opening of this course and of the Warm Springs resort will mean much to golfing in Georgia, and I sincerely hope that with your assistance we will be able to interest O. B. And Bobby in this event./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (9) Date: July 31, 1928, on Democratic National Committee, John J. Raskob, Chairman, letterhead: "My dear Major Cohen: "According to the lists at Headquarters Mr. G. B. Maddox is chairman of your State Committee and his address is given as Rome./ Mrs. Bessie Anderson is given as secretary and her address is State Capitol, Atlanta./ I would greatly appreciate it if you would confirm this list as it is important that I get a correct list at the earliest possible moment. If, in addition, you can give me the names of your executive committee and their addresses it will be of considerable help./ Yours very truly,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (10) Date: October 8, 1928, on personal letterhead, from 49 East 65th Street: "Dear Major:/ It was very delightful to me to get your telegram when I was down at Warm Springs last week aud I appreciate your thought in sending it./ I am on my way back to New York via Cleveland and shall be in the fight from now on. It looks to me as if we have a splendid chance of carrying New York for both the National and State tickets./ That was a delightful day which you gave me in Atlanta and I hope that I was of some help. It seems to me that the situation in Georgia is improving daily and I have heard that this is also true in the neighboring States./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (11) Date: November 14, 1928, from Warm Springs, Georgia on personal letterhead to Harllee Branch, Esq. Of The Atlanta Journal: "My dear Mr. Branch:–/ Thanks for the letter and clippings./ Hope to see you soon./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (12) Date: November 16, 1928, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on Roosevelt & O'Connor letterhead: "My dear Major:/ As you no doubt know, ere now, Mr. Branch gave me your letter, which I appreciate much./ We enjoyed his trip here, and only wish that you could have been along. I hope it will not be long before you correct this./ With best wishes,/ Sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (13) Date: November 19, 1928, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on personal letterhead: My dear Major:–/ Many thanks for your nice letter of November 16th. Apparently my election is confirmed by the latest returns. I wish that I could come to Atlanta when Governor Smith stops over but it is absolutely impossible, as I have and shall have such a short time at Warm Springs that I cannot miss a single day of exercising./ I hope that you will run down here without fail before I leave, a little over two weeks hence./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (14) Date: November 30, 1928, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on personal letterhead: "Dear Major:–/ I hope much that you can run down on next Sunday. I wish I could have you for a meal but I expect to have the Assembly and Senate leaders here, as well as Lieutenant Governor Herbert H. Lehman./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (15) Date: May 6, 1929, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "My dear Mr. Cohen ["Mr. Cohen" is crossed out by FDR who then writes in his own hand "Major"]:/ I am glad to have your letter of the 2nd, and I wish very much that I could address the Atlanta Rotary Club this month. However, when I accepted the nomination for Governorship, the doctor in charge forced a promise from me that I should accept no invitations to leave Warm Springs during my all too short visit here this Spring. Consequently, with the exception of addressing the Atlanta Bar Association, which I promised a year ago I would do this Spring, I am not making any speeches or leaving Warm Springs for more than four hours. Do give me another chance to attend a meeting./ I hope you will get time to run down to see me before I leave the end of the month. Also I hope I shall have a glimpse of you when I am in Atlanta for the Bar Association Dinner./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (16) Date: June 28, 1929, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:–/ Our good friend Howard Coffin is, of course, very interested in the general plan for the development of Georgia highways, and, as I have not been in touch with the situation since I left Warm Springs on June first, I am wondering if you would mind dropping him [FDR crosses out "him" and writes in his own hand next to the crossed-out word "me"] a line to tell him what the situation is, now that the Legislature has met. Do you think that they will be able to work out some definite constructive plan?/ I know that you are in favor of action and would be very grateful if you would give him a brief outline of the general way in which you think the problem should be worked out./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (17) Date: December 4, 1929, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "My dear Major:/ Thanks for your note./ As far as I know, there is no thought on the part of Dr. Kieb of resigning but in case any change is made I shall be glad to remember your friend./ I am sorry I am not able to see you on this trip to Georgia. When you come to New York for the next A. P. Meeting why don't you run up to Albany and see us?/ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (18) Date: May 26, 1930, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "My dear Major:/ I wish much that I might come to the luncheon in honor of the visiting foreign journalists this Thursday, but I have a delegation coming here that day and cannot be away. I am leaving Warm Springs early the following morning so I fear that I shall miss you on this trip./ If you come north this summer, run up and see us in Albany./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (19) Date: November 13, 1930, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Ever so many thanks for your nice telegram. I hope I shall see you soon. [FDR then writes in his own hand:] Do come down to Warm Springs –/ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (20) Date: November 25, 1930, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead to Harllee Branch, Esq. Of The Atlanta Journal: "My dear Mr. Branch:/ Miss LeHand has shown me your letter and the editorial comment. I am very glad to see it. Thank you for sending it./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (21) Date: December 2, 1930, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead. FDR writes in his own hand "Personal" above the salutation: "Dear Jack:/ We all missed you greatly last Saturday night and I do hope that you are much better and will be able to run down here for lunch some day before I leave on December the tenth./ I enclose an editorial from the Rochester Times-Union which shows that even in upstate New York they have an appreciation of the perils we all ran! It was a grand dinner and I wish you could have been there./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (22) Date: December 5, 1930, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead, typed "Personal" above the salutation: "Dear Jack:/ I have your telegram and I am awfully sorry that Mrs. Roosevelt and I cannot attend the dinner of The Presidents' Club. We both regret it./ Do get well soon and come to see me if you possibly can./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (23) Date: April 9, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Many thanks for sending me the copies of those two very delightful letters. Jesse Straus and his wife spent the night at the Mansion with us. I an sorry not to be in Atlanta at the time of his visit./ Your statement for the press is excellent. I do hope that our friend will not rock the boat to a point that is dangerous./ I think our best policy for the next few weeks is, as we used to say when I was a boy, ‘to keep our eye peeled'./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (24) Date: April 22, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Just a line to tell you that I hope to be in Warm Springs from May second until about the twenty-eighth. I do hope you and Mrs. Cohen will be able to come down to see us while we are there./ My best wishes,/ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (25) Date: June 22, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead to Harllee Branch, Esq. Of The Atlanta Journal: "My dear Mr. Branch:/ Many thanks for your note and the clipping./ As you know, I am much disappointed that I could not come to Georgia in May on account of my mother's illness but I am planning now to come the end of September./ Thank the Major for all that he has done and is doing./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (26) Date: July 16, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Will you give me a slant on this organization, and whether you think I should send a letter, – if so, along what line?/ Sincerely yours,/ FDR." (27) Date: August 24, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead. FDR writes in his own hand "Private" above the salutation: "My dear Major:/ This is one of dozens of letters I am receiving in regard to the Southern Clubs. Mr. Howe wrote some days ago to Branch asking him what their standing was and whether our friends were in control of their activities. In Alabama they have selected a man named Reese as their Vice-President who appears to be peculiarly persona non grata to the regular organization. I do think it would be wise to step in and take this whole organization over and make sure that it is run on conservative lines and not as an excuse for factional organizations in States where the regular organization is friendly. Let me know how I should answer this man and don't forget to return his letter./ I hope to keep to my schedule for Warn Springs, although the extra session is a little disconcerting./ Sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (28) Date: September 7, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Major:–/ Many thanks for your excellent letter of August 31st, with which I agree wholly. Two days ago I called up Dr. Gilbert on the telephone and wrote him, as per enclosed draft of a letter which, however, it was not necessary to send because he seemed fully to understand. I think he will turn the meeting into a welcome home party. Incidentally, I shall hope to see you very soon after I get down./ Our Legislature is milling around as usual and I hope they will leave by the eighteenth so that I can go to Warm Springs the twenty-first – but it is not yet at all certain./ As ever yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (29) Date: September 23, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead. FDR writes in his own hand "Personal" above the salutation: "Dear Jack:/ I hope to get off the end of this week and therefore that I shall have the pleasure of seeing you at Warm Springs very soon after my arrival. The Legislature has finally gone home after giving me about ninety-seven per cent of all I wanted. I think the political meeting at Warm Springs has been definitely stopped and that if there is any meeting there will be merely a welcome home party by the neighbors./ Always sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (30) Date: October 9, 1931, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Just a line to thank you for sending me the memorandum about Mr. Evans. Do let me know when he is in Atlanta. I shall be glad to see him./ I enjoyed our visit on Sunday tremendously. Let us do it again very soon./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (31) Date: November 17, 1931, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Thank you ever so much for sending me the editorial from the Journal. It is a very good one. As you know, I an trying to get to Warm Springs Thursday. I do hope I shall have opportunity of seeing you while I an there./ Very sincerely yours,/ FDR." (32) Date: December 3, 1931, from Warm Springs, Georgia, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Major Cohen  ["Major Cohen" is crossed out by FDR who then writes in his own hand "Jack"]:/ In regard to this service men's league suggestion, I have of course had a great many similar suggestions in different states. I am inclined to think that the best thing to do would be to get the opinion of Henry Stevens, the new Commander of the Legion and also of whichever high official of the Veterans of Foreign Wars is a Democrat. Of course, Stevens can do nothing official because he is National Commander but his advice would be good. I thoroughly believe in an organization among the Democratic service men. It is of the utmost importance that we should not allow the Republican organization to unite them as was done in the case of the G.A.R. A really representative organization could, I think, be started with perfect propriety./ Always sincerely,/ FDR." (33) Date: January 4, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Will you read the inclosed together with copy of my reply to the letter? Don't bother to acknowledge this. It is, of course, none of my business./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (34) Date: February 8, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Major Cohen  ["Major Cohen" is crossed out by FDR who then writes in his own hand "Jack"]:/ Thank you so much for your greetings on my birthday. It was good of you to think of me. [FDR then writes in his own hand:] I hope you're all well again – / Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (35) Date: February 11, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "My dear Major Cohen:/ I am indeed grateful to you for your letter of February 9th, apprising me of the rules and regulations adopted for the Georgia Presidential Primary on March 23d next. I gratefully accept the suggestion of my Georgia friends and neighbors that I authorize the use of my name on the Democratic ballot in this Primary./ I do not need to assure you or the people of Georgia of my deep personal affection for what I consider ‘my other State.' I have to hold a deep affection for it and its people. I am especially happy in the knowledge that this affectionate regard is reciprocated. I am deeply touched by the request of my friends, through you, that they have the privilege of paying my entrance fee in the forthcoming primary. May I accept this generous offer, but at the same time, because I feel that this is in a very proper sense a personal obligation, I am going to contribute $1,000.00 (the amount of the fee) to the Patients Aid Fund of the Georgia Warms [sic] Springs Foundation, for the special purpose of giving assistance to the children of Georgia. You know how very close to my heart is the treatment at Warm Springs for children who have had Infantile Paralysis./ I am today writing to Miss Stella Akin, Secretary of the Georgia State Democratic Executive Committee formally entering my name in the forthcoming primaries./ With my warm personal regards, and best wishes,/ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (36) Date: March 10, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:/ Many thanks for your fine telegram./ You are right about the intensive fight in New Hampshire. The other crowd spent money like water but I carried 98% of the townships and eight out of eleven cities; and of the other three, I lost one by only twenty votes and another by only a little over one hundred votes. News from all the other places continues to be good. You are doing a grand piece of work. I don't need to tell you how much I appreciate it./ Always sincerely,/ FDR." (37) Date: March 22, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:–/ Thank you ever so much for your awfully nice telegram. I hope everything goes well on Wednesday and I feel very confident that it will./ I look forward to seeing you on May first./ Always sincerely,/ FDR." (38) Date: March 24, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "Dear Major Cohen:/ This is just a line to thank you for your telegrams and messages and to attempt to thank you for the splendid work you and the Committee have done in Georgia. I am sure you know how much I appreciate it and how touched I am by the Georgia vote./ I need not tell you how I am looking forward to seeing you when I get to Georgia./ Always sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (39) Date: April 22, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead: "My dear Major Cohen:/ Thank you for the copy of the letter from Mr. Thompson. As you suggest, I have passed this on to Mr. Howe./ I should have written you before this to tell you how much I appreciate the action taken by the Democrats of Georgia and to thank you for your share in it. As you doubtless know, I have been working under very heavy pressure recently and I am looking forward to getting back to Warm Springs, where I can thank all my friends in person for their loyalty during the past weeks./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." (40) Date: August 19, 1933 on The White House Washington letterhead: "My dear Jack:/ The ‘Little Colonel' left your nice letter of introduction at the office yesterday. Steve, who is batting for Mac, just could not find a moment for him and really I did not have a moment. I know Mr. Kay understood the situation./ I wish I could talk at the christening, but I simply cannot. Won't a little message to be read answer the purpose? I will be happy to send one./ My best wishes to you. When you are in Washington be sure to come in to see me./ Very sincerely yours,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt." There are also two secretarial proxy signatures in this wonderful FDR archive, the first dated October 16, 1928, on FDR's personal letterhead, with very interesting content related to FDR's efforts on behalf of Alfred E. Smith: "Dear Mr. Cohen:/ I have not heard what decision you have made as between the two Presidential candidates, but remembering your firm belief in the policies and ideals of Woodrow Wilson, I am encouraged to hope that you have decided as I have decided – that under Governor Smith, our country stands far more chance of returning to the path blazed out for us by our greatest President, than under the materialistic and self-seeking advisers who surround the other candidate; men whose influence has already made it manifest that high ideals and a forward-looking policy – not only for this country, but for the world – would stand as little chance under Mr. Hoover as they have stood under President Harding, President Coolidge and Mr. Mellon./ To me, the contemptuous casting aside of all of President Wilson's wonderful dreams of a better world, and the substitution of crass materialism and, a dollar-and-cents viewpoint of everything has been a world tragedy. I know Governor Smith and I know that in his own way his interest in humanity, his intolerance of the oppression of the weak and his desire to help those handicapped by circumstances has led him to the same belief as to what our country's attitude should be, and as to how its course should be guided, as animated President Wilson./ I would deeply appreciate it if you would write me confidentially what you have decided, addressing the letter to my house, 49 East 65th Street, New York City./ Yours very truly,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt [proxy signature]." The second secretarial proxy signature letter is dated May 6, 1931, on Executive Mansion Albany letterhead: "Dear Jack:–/ I am dictating this just before the boat sails to tell you how very much I appreciate your nice telegram which I found here on the boat. It was good of you to think of me./ I look forward to seeing you in Warm Springs this fall./ Always sincerely,/ Franklin D. Roosevelt [proxy signature]." There is also a letter to Cohen dated February 24, 1932, on State of New York Executive Chamber Albany letterhead written by FDR's secretary Guernsey T. Cross, and a second dated December 3, 1934, on The White House Washington letterhead written by FDR's key advisor and personal secretary to the President Colonel Louis McHenry Howe. In addition to an invitation to FDR's re-inauguration as Governor of New York and the luncheon that followed at the Executive Mansion in Albany on January 1, 1931, there is a wonderful cache of eleven Western Union and Postal Telegraph telegrams, ranging from May 27, 1921 to August 19, 1933 related to both personal and political issues and events. A one of a kind, magnificent, historical archive relating to the close personal and professional correspondence over 14 years between FDR and John S. "Major" Cohen, sent by FDR to Cohen between the critical years of 1921 to 1934, a span of time beginning when FDR was inflicted by poliomyelitis, through the period he discovered and then developed the rehabilitation center at Warm Springs, Georgia to the southwest of Atlanta, as well as the period FDR re-emerged politically as both Governor of New York and ultimately President of the United States.



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