Description

    Leon Henderson, FDR's Administrator of the Office of Price Administration During WWII, Archive.
    -Wartime dates and after. Various sizes.
    -Primarily to New York Post columnist Leonard Lyons.
    -Very good or better condition.

    A historic collection from Leon Henderson, FDR's Administrator of the Office of Price Administration during World War II, one of the bright young men drawn to government service by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal. Henderson was an economist, serving in several important administrative capacities before World War II such as his appointment to the Securities and Exchange Commission in 1939, and then put in charge of domestic price stabilization, one of the most important domestic administrative positions in support of the War effort. He often tangled with Congress and left his job in 1943 during one such battle. He continued to work for FDR, even serving as a representative of the United States in Europe pertaining to reconstruction. Through all this Henderson maintained a close friendship with Leonard Lyons, a columnist for the New York Post. His letters during the early 1940s usually pertained to his getting away from Washington, D.C. and enjoying the night life of New York City, usually with Lyons (Henderson had a wife and family but this did not apparently constrain him which may account for their divorce shortly after the War). After the war, Henderson's letters took on a more reflective, historical tone and even referred to Lyons as his biographer. It is in these later letters that he speaks more openly about what went on in the capital during the war. This extensive archive contains eighteen autograph letters signed, five typed letters signed, nine autograph notes unsigned, one typed note unsigned, three telegrams, two autograph notes signed on postcards, one autograph note signed by his wife, and three unsigned typed manuscripts of six pages on historical matters. In one poignant handwritten note to Lyons by Leon Henderson at the top of an original typed carbon set, Henderson writes: "I've just sent the original hand notes and a copy of what I enclose to the Hyde Park Library./ Leon." The carbon to which he refers, and this is the original of the copy he sent to the FDR Library in Hyde Park, New York, is dated March 13, 1945 under the title "F.D.R." and begins: "I saw the President today. And I'm scared. It wasn't only his appearance as an old man (since I saw him in 1942). It wasn't just his preoccupation with other affairs. I've seen than happen before when he was having a 'duty' appointment. It was the whole atmosphere of incredibility." A one of a kind collection.


    More Information:

    The extended description below was supplied by the consignor. We are making it available to our web bidders who are interested in more in-depth research and broader historical perspective. Please note that presentation (i.e. framing), lot divisions, and interpretations of condition and content may occasionally differ from our descriptions. Assertions of fact and subjective observations contained in this description represent the opinion of the consignor. These remarks have not been checked for accuracy by Heritage Auctions, and we assume no responsibility for their accuracy; they are offered purely to allow the bidder insight into the way the consignor has viewed the item(s) in question. No right of return or claim of lack of authenticity or provenance based upon this extended description will be granted.

     

    A fabulous, one of a kind, historic collection from Leon Henderson, FDR's Administrator of the Office of Price Administration during World War II, one of the bright young men, the wunderkind, drawn to government service by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal. Henderson was an economist, serving in several important administrative capacities before World War II such as his appointment to the Securities and Exchange Commission in 1939, and then put in charge of domestic price stabilization, one of the most important domestic administrative positions in support of the War effort. He often tangled with Congress and left his job in 1943 during one such battle. He continued to work for FDR, even serving as a representative of the United States in Europe pertaining to reconstruction. Through all this Henderson maintained a close friendship with Leonard Lyons, a columnist for the New York Post. His letters during the early 1940s usually pertained to his getting away from Washington, D.C. and enjoying the night life of New York City, usually with Lyons (Henderson had a wife and family but this did not apparently constrain him which may account for their divorce shortly after the War). After the war, Henderson's letters took on a more reflective, historical tone and even referred to Lyons as his biographer. It is in these later letters that he speaks more openly about what went on in the capital during the war. This extensive archive contains eighteen autograph letters signed, five typed letters signed, nine autograph notes unsigned, one typed note unsigned, three telegrams, two autograph notes signed on postcards, one autograph note signed by his wife, and three unsigned typed manuscripts of six pages on historical matters, for a total of forty-two historic pieces. Henderson's papers were donated by him to the FDR Library at Hyde Park, New York. In one poignant handwritten note to Lyons by Leon Henderson at the top of an original typed carbon set, Henderson writes: "I've just sent the original hand notes and a copy of what I enclose to the Hyde Park Library./ Leon." The carbon to which he refers, and this is the original of the copy he sent to the FDR Library in Hyde Park, New York, is dated March 13, 1945 under the title "F.D.R." and begins: "I saw the President today. And I'm scared. It wasn't only his appearance as an old man (since I saw him in 1942). It wasn't just his preoccupation with other affairs. I've seen than happen before when he was having a ‘duty' appointment. It was the whole atmosphere of incredibility." A one of a kind collection.



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    Auction Dates
    June, 2008
    7th Saturday
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