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In This Issue:
Sunday Internet Comics Auction
$6+ million Heritage US Comics & Comic Art Auction evidences rising market
The Origins of Jim Vadeboncoeur's Complete Atlas Collection
Employment Opportunities
Around Heritage Auctions
Cover of the Week: Art Appreciation
Current Auctions
June 4, 2015
Newsletter Archive
Last Issue
Sunday Internet Auction
Sunday Internet Comics Auction Spotlight
Auction Ends:
June 7, 2015
Live Session at 6:00 PM CT

Our EC selection includes three of the oh-so desirable annuals. 19 lots of DC War comics are offered this week And no less than 22 Golden Age Captain America lots are offered this week!
Cover art by Feldstein
Cover art by Feldstein
Sgt. Rock, by Kubert
Sgt. Rock, by Kubert
The desirable horror-themed issue 74.
The desirable horror-themed issue 74.


Highlights of our auction include:

Venus #16 (Timely, 1951) Condition: VG+ Venus #16 (Timely, 1951) Condition: VG+
Bill Everett story, cover, and art. Joe Maneely art. There is tape on the inside front cover. Overstreet 2014 VG 4.0 value = $220. From the Jim Vadeboncoeur, Jr. Collection.
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Detective Comics #40 (DC, 1940) CGC VG 4.0 Off-white to white pages Detective Comics #40 (DC, 1940) CGC VG 4.0 Off-white to white pages
Featuring Batman and Robin. Includes the origin and first appearance of Clayface, and the first Joker cover appearance (sans white face and purple suit). The Joker story that was intended for this issue was instead used in Batman #1, and the cover of this issue is very similar to a splash page in that book. Artists include Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson, and Fred Guardineer. CGC notes, "Very minor amount of glue on spine of cover." Overstreet 2014 VG 4.0 value = $2,000. CGC census 5/15: 5 in 4.0, 23 higher.
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Daredevil #1 (Marvel, 1964) CGC VG+ 4.5 Off-white pages Daredevil #1 (Marvel, 1964) CGC VG+ 4.5 Off-white pages
The origin and first appearance of Daredevil, and the first appearances of Karen Page and Foggy Nelson. Jack Kirby and Bill Everett cover, with Everett art. Overstreet 2014 VG 4.0 value = $642. CGC census 5/15: 152 in 4.5, 1163 higher.
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Journey Into Mystery #83 (Marvel, 1962) CGC FN 6.0 Off-white to white pages Journey Into Mystery #83 (Marvel, 1962) CGC FN 6.0 Off-white to white pages
The origin and first appearance of Thor (Doctor Don Blake). Jack Kirby cover and art. Steve Ditko art. Currently #6 on Overstreet's list of Top 20 Silver Age Comics. Overstreet 2014 FN 6.0 value = $4,200. CGC census 5/15: 61 in 6.0, 169 higher.
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Batman #232 (DC, 1971) CGC NM+ 9.6 White pages Batman #232 (DC, 1971) CGC NM+ 9.6 White pages
The first appearance of Ra's Al Ghul, has DC retelling the origin of Batman and Robin. Talia, Ra's Al Ghul's daughter makes a cameo appearance. Neal Adams cover and art. Overstreet 2014 NM- 9.2 value = $500. CGC census 5/15: 79 in 9.6, 44 higher.
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Jack Kirby and D. Bruce Berry Silver Star #5 Page 7 Original Art (Pacific Comics, 1983) Jack Kirby and D. Bruce Berry Silver Star #5 Page 7 Original Art (Pacific Comics, 1983)
One of Jack "King" Kirby's 1970's character creations, Silver Star was originally a screenplay for a movie pitch. Norma Richmond and the evil Darius Drumm are featured on this pulse-pounding page of pure peril! Produced in ink over graphite on Bristol board with an image area of 10" x 15". Slight tanning. In Excellent condition.
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John Buscema and Klaus Janson Raiders of the Lost Ark #2 Page 2 Indiana Jones Original Art (Marvel, 1981) John Buscema and Klaus Janson Raiders of the Lost Ark #2 Page 2 Indiana Jones Original Art (Marvel, 1981)
One of the classic scenes from the movie, the fight in Marion Ravenwood's bar is featured on this page, with a great image of Indy with whip and gun in hand! Produced in ink over graphite on Bristol board with an image area of 10" x 15". Slight tanning with one corner trimmed, otherwise in Excellent condition.
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Mike Grell and Bob Smith Warlord #45 Page 16 Original Art (DC, 1981) Mike Grell and Bob Smith Warlord #45 Page 16 Original Art (DC, 1981)
Warlord, Aton, and Jennifer Morgan attempt a narrow escape from a pair of Cyclopes on this page from "Nightmare in Vista-Vision". Ink and graphite on DC Bristol board. This piece has an image area of 10" x 15" and is in Excellent condition with trimming to the top edge.
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Incredible Hulk Production Cel signed by Stan Lee (Marvel, c. 1980s) Incredible Hulk Production Cel signed by Stan Lee (Marvel, c. 1980s)
This hand-painted production cel of the Hulk is just smashing! Ol' Jade-Jaws stands 6.5" tall on this 12 field 3-peghole animation cel that is signed by his co-creator, Stan Lee. In Fine condition.
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All Dogs Go to Heaven Anne-Marie and Charlie Publicity Cel Signed by John Pomeroy (Amblin/Bluth, 1989) All Dogs Go to Heaven Anne-Marie and Charlie Publicity Cel Signed by John Pomeroy (Amblin/Bluth, 1989)
Outstanding hand-painted 16 field publicity cel of Anne-Marie and Charlie. A beautiful pose with nice images of 8" and 9". This outstanding cel is signed by supervising animator John Pomeroy! Two pieces of tape on top border; otherwise, in Fine condition.
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Our MyHeritage: MyBids feature makes tracking your favorite items easier than ever. Just a reminder... our Sunday Internet Comics Auctions end with a Live Session at 6:00 PM CT

Browse the entire auction here.

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$6+ million Heritage US Comics & Comic Art Auction evidences rising market
Alex Raymond Flash Gordon
The original art from Alex Raymond's March 21, 1939 Flash Gordon and Jungle Jim Sunday comic strip (King Features Syndicate) brought $155,350 on Friday, May 29, 2015 at Heritage Auctions — the third highest price ever realized on a piece of original comic strip art at the company — to pace the company's $6+ million Comics & Comic Art Signature® Auction, May 28-30, 2015.

"Collector interest in original art continues to be strong," said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President at Heritage Auctions, "especially as concerns the big names in early comic strips."

This was abundantly evident in not just the auction's top lot, but also in the lots that occupy the numbers two and three on the final auction tally sheet: Winsor McCay's surreal original Little Nemo in Slumberland Sunday comic strip art dated July 18, 1909 (New York Herald) was the subject of spirited bidding before it finished the day at $131,450, a new world record price for the artist, while Alex Raymond made another appearance with his Flash Gordon Sunday comic strip original art dated July 12, 1936 (King Features Syndicate), which realized $89,625.

On the comic book side of the auction, the Dark Knight reigned supreme, garnering an impressive $83,650 final price realized for a CGC-graded 8.0 copy of Detective Comics #33 (DC, 1939), while a CGC-graded 4.5 copy of Batman #1 (DC, 1940), the #6 comic book on Overstreet's Top 100 Golden Age comics list, brought $77,675.

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The Origins of Jim Vadeboncoeur's Complete Atlas Collection
Captain America Comics #76 (Atlas, 1954) Condition: GD+
The auction ending this Sunday is the first of many to feature Jim Vadeboncoeur Jr.'s complete Atlas collection.

If you missed the catalog for our May auction, here you can read the whole story behind the collection:

The Origins of My Complete Atlas Collection

By Jim Vadeboncoeur Jr

I've never been a typical comic book collector.

I bought my first one, Spider-Man #33, when I was 19. And when my mom threw it out the next day, I just bought it again and did a better job of concealing it and its fellow Silver Age Marvel brethren from her.

It was Steve Ditko's art that attracted me to that comic in the first place, and it has always been the art in comics that has kept me here. 1966 through 1969 were great years for comics, for comic art, and for my collection. Within that span I completed my Marvel collection and expanded my collecting focus to include ECs and any comics with art by the Marvel or EC artists that I loved. Living halfway between Gary Arlington's San Francisco Comic Book Company and John Barrett and Bud Plant's Seven Sons Comic Book Shop, two of the earliest manifestations of that phenomenon, made such goals and focus possible.

A trait that separated me from my fellow collectors was the ease with which I was able to discern the identities of the creators. A good example was a serious collector friend who was a big Frazetta fan. I had just finished creating a collage for him utilizing the small pen drawing frontispieces from the Ace Tarzan books. I mean he loved Frazetta. So when I showed him a copy of All-Star Western #99 with Botalye — Immortal Indian Warrior, I was certain he'd be thrilled. I learned just how differently we saw things when he looked at it and said, "That's really cool! Who is it, Wally Wood?"

As I completed my Marvel set, I was looking ahead at what to focus on next. This was before Overstreet's Comic Book Price Guide, but after von Bernewitz's Complete EC Checklist. I'd been buying ECs at the ungodly price of $5 to $10 apiece, and I could find some of the same artists in Atlas for a buck. Plus there was so much to learn about Atlas. How many titles were there? What were the first issue numbers, the final issue numbers? What other artists worked there?

Rather than re-cover the EC collecting ground of others, I decided to take up the challenge of defining Atlas. Overstreet was soliciting information for the first guide. Jerry Bails was deep into production of the first Who's Who. My research would contribute to both over the next decade.

It's easy to put an "official" end point to Atlas: October 1957. That's the last time an Atlas globe appeared on a comic book. However, that leaves all the issues of all titles published between then and Fantastic Four #1 in some sort of labeling limbo. Which is exactly what they were: unbranded! I chose to include all the "pre-super-hero" issues in my "Atlas Collection". So, even though Tales of Suspense doesn't begin until 1958, a full year after Atlas has imploded, it's part of MY Atlas Collection. I'm the "Decider!"

If it's possible, the beginning of Atlas is even grayer... Yes, we can pin down the actual first appearance of the Atlas Globe, but you have to go back to Comedy Comics #22 or Captain America #36 in March 1944 – smack-dab in what everyone agrees is Timely! Atlas becomes a permanent brand icon in November 1951, but on books that are already well-established, like Two – Gun Kid and Justice – making it seem rather arbitrary to begin a collection ignoring the first ten issues of one title and the first 23 of another!

So I "decided" again: all the books that extended into the Atlas era, were Atlas from their beginning. And similar books, e.g. westerns or crime titles from those eras, that didn't last until Atlas were Atlas, too! I mean, if a Two-Gun Kid issue from 1949 was going to be deemed Atlas, how could I exclude an issue of Tex Morgan from the same month? Complicated? Sure, but Martin Goodman was famous for not making things easy.

So MY Atlas collection extends from the Timely Bullpen output of Crime, Western and what would become Horror books of late 1947 through to issues just before the Silver Age super-hero titles of the Sixties. A solid fifteen years' worth of output, minus only the tail end of the Golden Age Timely super-hero titles and the earliest manifestations of their Marvel reincarnations.

Of course, I didn't realize that scope at the beginning, just as I had no real notion of the magnitude of the task I'd set for myself... nor the glorious life I'd have accomplishing it!

All I knew was it was 1969, I was out of college, I had completed my "Marvel set" (as we called them), I had a good job, and wasn't living at home, so my mom couldn't throw my comics out any more! There was a rock solid collector base in San Jose with Seven Sons Comic Book Shop dealing only in back issues. Gary Arlington, as I mentioned, Barry Bauman in Oakland, and the glimmers of the convention circuit to come. New York, Oklahoma, Dallas, San Diego, Hollywood, etc. – all had a major convention, if not their first, between 1969-1972. I went to at least one in each city during that span.

But the biggest impact on my collection was a job that left me with over $900 of discretionary income each month. Once a month or so, I'd get in my car on a Friday afternoon after work and drive the 400 miles to Los Angeles. I'd spend the night in the car and after breakfast the next morning I'd visit Cherokee Book Store, Collectors' Books, and Bond Street Books. At each one, I'd stack up a pile of comics, primarily Atlas, and negotiate a price, usually in the neighborhood of a dollar a book! No plastic bags and no Price Guide. YOU had to know what was in the books or recognize the artists when you saw them. I had a distinct advantage over most. Then I'd drive back Saturday afternoon/evening, occasionally splurging for a Motel 6, when they really were $6 a night! When I got home, I'd make an index card with the content and artists for each book – tlas and all other companies, too.

In 1970, I began a lifelong process of sharing that information: I wrote an article detailing the post-1954 work of all of the EC artists, and a couple of non-EC favorites. It appeared in the second issue of Promethean Enterprises, a fanzine I published with Al Davoren and Bud Plant. In 1971, I compiled and released Al Williamson: His Work. Both featured healthy doses of Atlas Comics data. I was also submitting much of what I was learning to both Bob Overstreet, for his newly realized Comic Book Price Guideand to Jerry Bails for his and Hames Ware's soon to be released Who's Who of American Comic Books.

In connecting with The Who's Who, I encountered a soul mate in Hames Ware. We were to spend the next 40-plus years studying the unsigned creators of comic books. Hames' knowledge and vast experience drew me further backward in time and away from the narrow confines of Atlas. Had I focused my energies and resources solely on Atlas, as I had intended, I would have missed out on the most productive and challenging years of my life. Instead of an Atlas Collection, I developed a Comic Collection.

And, in the process, learned more about the creators of comics, from Hames, from Jerry Bails, from the creators I met and talked to: Pierce Rice, Manny Stallman, Alex Toth, John Buscema, John Severin. How much more I'd learned became evident when I fulfilled a promise I'd made to myself before turning the Atlas Collection over to Heritage. I transcribed my note cards for every issue, the artist/inker data for every Atlas story that I could figure out, onto the public record – in this case the on-line database, Atlas Tales. The extended detour through the 1940s (and the 1930s!) upon which Hames had led me, paid rich dividends in data for the 1950s. I was able to fill in a lot of 'blanks' I'd left on my cards of 45 years ago and correct myself with what I'd learned since then.

It's time to move on. A fifty year journey will end for the core of my collection. I'll still have lots of comic books, but for someone who 'defined' himself as "The Guy With a Complete Atlas Collection", 50 years later, I guess I'll have to be someone else. I'm pretty sure I'll enjoy whoever that is.

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Employment Opportunities
As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:
  • Asian Art Specialist
  • Photographs Specialist
  • World Coins Director: (Hong Kong)
If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:
  • Building Operations/Maintenance
  • Fine Jewelry Cataloger
  • Fine Jewelry Specialist
  • Marketing and Special Projects Assistant
  • Shipping Associate
  • World Coins Cataloger/Numismatist
If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

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Around Heritage Auctions
Indy car collectibles get the Green Flag in June Auto Racing auction in Dallas

Auto Racing Sports Collectibles Catalog Auction

Memorabilia from the great names and great days of America's most famous auto race, The Indy 500, will thrill race collectors and fans alike on June 18, 2015, at Heritage Auctions as the company presents its Auto Racing Sports Collectibles Catalog Auction, featuring the Dr. Harlen Hunter Collection.

"Hunter's collection is the most extensive of its kind in the world," said Chris Ivy, Director of Sports Auctions at Heritage. "For years, Dr. Hunter had access to the greatest drivers and race tracks in the world. In that time he amassed a deep and far-reaching collection of important race-used material."

Chief among Hunter's treasures that race fans will have access to is a program from the inaugural Indy 500 in 1911 signed by the legendary Ray Harroun, the first winner of America's greatest race. It is estimated at $2,000+. Indy 500 fans will also thrill at the inclusion of a set of "Gasoline Alley" Garage Doors, used at the Indianapolis Speedway from the 1930s to the 1960s, estimated at $3,000+.

"Little could be more evocative of the Indy 500 than these historically significant, vintage Indianapolis Motor Speedway doors," said Ivy. "These hung at Garage #2 in the original Gasoline Alley area and have not been repainted since they were removed. What gearhead would not want this as a prize?"

Hunter's collection also includes a complete set of signed Daytona 500 winner's photographs, 1959-2009, including the great Fireball Roberts, all of them pictured with the trophy. The album, with a $2,000+ estimate, features all the legendary names of racing, including Bob Welborn, John Beauchamp, Jeff Bodine, Bobby Ellison, Bill Elliott Jr., Fireball Roberts, Dale Earnhardt Sr., Tiny Lund, Richard Petty, Lee Petty, Buddy Baker, Leroy Yarbrough, and many more.

Not all of Hunter's collectibles relate exclusively to Indy, as evidenced by Mario Andretti's 1969 Daytona 500 Race Worn Helmet, estimate $2,000+, with superb notation on helmet from Andretti stating that he ended up "upside-down" in this helmet. AJ Foyt's 1967 Trenton Speedway 200 Mile USAC National Championship Race Winner's Trophy, estimated at $2,000+, is another important highlight from one of the greatest names in the sport, while an extremely rare 1916 Harvest Auto Racing Classic program, from the non-500 event held at the Speedway between 1911-1994, should thrill collectors of racing esoterica and ephemera, with an estimate of $1,500+.

More information about Sports auctions.

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Cover of the Week: Art Appreciation
The cover of Captain America Comics #56 might be the only comic book cover ever set at the Metropolitan Museum of Art!

Captain America Comics #56 (Timely, 1946) CGC Qualified VF 8.0 Off-white to white pages
Captain America Comics #56 (Timely, 1946) CGC Qualified VF 8.0 Off-white to white pages


We hadn't heard of the Met having price tags on the art though...

You can bid on Captain America Comics #56 here.

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June 19 Fine European Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5217 June 19 Fine European Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5217
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June 19 - 21 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates Decorative Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5218 June 19 - 21 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates Decorative Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5218
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June 17 William E. Fredeman Pre-Raphaelite Collection Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auctions #6135 June 17 William E. Fredeman Pre-Raphaelite Collection Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auctions #6135
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June 20 Vintage Guitars & Musical Instruments Signature Auction - Dallas #7112 June 20 Vintage Guitars & Musical Instruments Signature Auction - Dallas #7112
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June 27 Merrill C. Berman Collection Part II Americana & Political Grand Format Auction - Dallas #6132 June 27 Merrill C. Berman Collection Part II Americana & Political Grand Format Auction - Dallas #6132
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June 4
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Law Collection
Selections from the Law Collection of British Commonwealth Coins
June 28
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